Suppression

Apples

Category: Food

Type

Voluntary

Introduction and description

The apple is 'the pomaceous fruit of the apple tree, species Malus domestica in the rose family (Rosaceae)'.

It is one of the most widely cultivated tree fruits, and the most widely known of the many members of genus Malus that are used by humans. Apples grow on small, deciduous trees and there are more than 7,500 known cultivars of apples. The tree originated in Central Asia, where its wild ancestor, Malus sieversii, is still found today. Apples have been grown for thousands of years in Asia and Europe, and were brought to North America by European colonists.

And as we all know according to an old Welsh proverb
"An apple a day keeps the doctor away." 

To this however we need to add the ancient Yorkshire proverb
" put your apples on a tray and the doctor'll come each and every day" [as shown above] 

Background

The apple has an interesting alternative life in symbol systems and I have provided a section on the site under Apples and the apple tree which explores this.

Preliminary research suggests that apples may reduce the risk of colon cancer, prostate cancer and lung cancer. Apple peels contain ursolic acid which, in rat studies, increases skeletal muscle and brown fat, and decreases white fat, obesity, glucose intolerance, and fatty liver disease. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, a typical apple contains 126 calories with significant dietary fiber and vitamin C content. Apple peel is a source of various phytochemicals and possible antioxidant activity in vitro. The predominant phenolic phytochemicals in apples are quercetin, epicatechin, and procyanidin B2.”

Another interesting but totally irrelevant bit of information is that according to research 'fruit flies fed an apple extract lived 10% longer than other flies fed a normal diet'. [One would have thought a fruit fly's normal diet is fruit, but then who am I to question the wisdom of science, perhaps in labs they live on hamburgers]

Method

Don't wash them until just before you want to eat them, as the waxy coating on the apple helps preserve it and keep it fresher. In general it is best not to peel an apple. There are as many healing properties in the peel as the apple itself. Don't eat the seeds - in high doses they are poisonous.

Eating apples are delicious eaten raw, you have no need to do anything to them. They go well with cheese, they are delicious sliced or cubed in salads with nuts, and with cabbage in a coleslaw. Cooking apples go well simply stewed gently until cooked and served with pork, ham or sausages. Apple sauce with black pudding [boudin noir] is also delicious. And of course there are numerous ways you can make pies from them. Cooking apples can be left unpeeled and stuffed with dates, honey and nuts and baked, then served with cream.

Nutrients

09003, Apples, raw, with skin National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 26   Software v.1.3.1 Nutrient values and weights are for edible portion

Nutrient

Unit

Value per 100 g

 

Proximates

Water

g

85.56

 

Energy

kcal

52

 

Protein

g

0.26

 

Total lipid (fat)

g

0.17

 

Carbohydrate, by difference

g

13.81

 

Fiber, total dietary

g

2.4

 

Sugars, total

g

10.39

 

Minerals

Calcium, Ca

mg

6

 

Iron, Fe

mg

0.12

 

Magnesium, Mg

mg

5

 

Phosphorus, P

mg

11

 

Potassium, K

mg

107

 

Sodium, Na

mg

1

 

Zinc, Zn

mg

0.04

 

Vitamins

Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid

mg

4.6

 

Thiamin

mg

0.017

 

Riboflavin

mg

0.026

 

Niacin

mg

0.091

 

Vitamin B-6

mg

0.041

 

Folate, DFE

µg

3

 

Vitamin B-12

µg

0.00

 

Vitamin A, RAE

µg

3

 

Vitamin A, IU

IU

54

 

Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)

mg

0.18

 

Vitamin D (D2 + D3)

µg

0.0

 

Vitamin D

IU

0

 

Vitamin K (phylloquinone)

µg

2.2

 

Lipids

Fatty acids, total saturated

g

0.028

 

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated

g

0.007

 

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated

g

0.051

 

Cholesterol

mg

0

 

Other

Caffeine

mg

0

 


 

How it works

see the observations, which are all from Pubmed and describe the healing properties.

 

Related observations