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Kish - The Kish archaeological site

Identifier

022200

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

Kish - The Kish archaeological site

The Kish archaeological site is actually an oval area roughly 5 miles by 2 miles, transected by the dry former bed of the Euphrates River, encompassing around 40 mounds, the largest being Uhaimir and Ingharra. Thus the site is Egg shaped and conforms to sacred geography.  The most notable mounds are:-

  • Tell Uhaimir - believed to be the location of the city of Kish. It means "the red" after the red bricks of the ziggurat there.
  • Tell Ingharra - believed to be the location of Hursagkalamma, east of Kish home of a temple of Inanna.  This shows that sexual methods were used to achieve spiritual experience
  • Tell Khazneh
  • Tell el-Bender - held Parthian material
  • Mound W - where a number of Neo-Assyrian tablets were discovered

After irregularly excavated tablets began appearing at the beginning of the twentieth century, François Thureau-Dangin identified the site as being Kish. Those tablets ended up in a variety of museums.

A French archaeological team under Henri de Genouillac excavated at Tell Uhaimir between 1912 and 1914, finding some 1,400 Old Babylonian tablets which were distributed to the Istanbul Archaeology Museum and the Louvre. Later, a joint Field Museum and University of Oxford team under Stephen Langdon excavated from 1923 to 1933, with the recovered materials split between Chicago and the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford.

The actual excavations at Tell Uhaimir were led initially by E. MacKay and later by L. C. Watelin. Work on the faunal and flora remains was conducted by Henry Field.

More recently, a Japanese team from the Kokushikan University led by Ken Matsumoto excavated at Tell Uhaimir in 1988, 2000, and 2001. The final season lasted only one week.

 

A description of the experience

The source of the experience

Mesopotamian system

Concepts, symbols and science items

Concepts

Egg
Map of the Egg

Symbols

Map of the Egg

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Commonsteps

References