Suppression

Oats

Category: Food

Type

Voluntary

Introduction and description

 

The oat (Avena sativa), sometimes called the common oat, is a species of cereal grain grown for its seed.

We can eat it, but one of the most common uses is as livestock feed.  It is classified as a wholegrain on this site for general nutritional purposes.

The wild ancestor of Avena sativa grew in the Fertile Crescent of the Near East, but these days, the biggest producer is Russia, followed by Canada, Poland, Finland, Australia, the USA, Spain, the UK, Sweden and Germany.  Overall they are a crop for temperate regions, as they have a lower summer heat requirement and a greater tolerance of rain than other cereals, such as wheat, rye or barley, so are particularly important in areas with cool, wet summers, such as Northwest Europe and even Iceland. As it says on Wikipedia “In Scotland, oats were, and still are, held in high esteem, as a mainstay of the national diet”.  Traditional Scottish porridge is made from oats, haggis is made from oats.

Oat bread with a poached egg and hollandaise sauce

 

 

Getting your oats’ in England has a somewhat different meaning – pleasurable .... just like porridge, but requiring – odd though it may sound – no oats at all.

 

 

Oats and gluten intolerance

Interest in oats has been spurred by the realisation that some varieties of oats are a potential alternative to wheat, rye, barley etc for those with Coeliac disease (celiac disease).  Here is the abstract of a paper on this:

 

A strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only currently available therapeutic treatment for patients with celiac disease (CD). Traditionally, treatment with a GFD has excluded wheat, barley and rye, while the presence of oats is a subject of debate.
The most-recent research indicates that some cultivars of oats can be a safe part of a GFD.
In order to elucidate the toxicity of the prolamins from oat varieties with low, medium, and high CD toxicity, the avenin genes of these varieties were cloned and sequenced, and their expression quantified throughout the grain development. ……..
Avenin proteins presented a lower proline content than that of wheat gliadin; this may contribute to the low toxicity shown by oat avenins. …… oat grains had both monomeric and polymeric avenins, termed in this paper gliadin- and glutenin-like avenins.
We found a direct correlation between the immunogenicity of the different oat varieties and the presence of the specific peptides with a higher/lower potential immunotoxicity. The specific peptides from the oat variety with the highest toxicity have shown a higher potential immunotoxicity. These results suggest that there is wide range of variation of potential immunotoxicity of oat cultivars PMID:  23284616

So it is not all oats that are safe – just some oats.  Another extract just to confirm this

Clanachan with strawberries

Three groups of oat cultivars reacting differently against moAb G12 could be distinguished:

 - a group with considerable affinity,
 - a group showing slight reactivity and
 - a third with no detectable reactivity.

The immunogenicity of the three types of oats as well as that of a positive and negative control was determined with isolated peripheral blood mononuclear T cells from patients with CD by measurement of cell proliferation and interferon γ release.

A direct correlation of the reactivity with G12 and the immunogenicity of the different prolamins was observed.  PMID: 21317420

It is noticeable that many people who show sensitivity to wheat, show sensitivity to just about every other man made ‘non natural’ food or chemical as well.  So they cannot tolerate man made unnatural medicines, food additives, or GM food.  In effect, their system rejects anything that is not the work of Nature. 

vegetarian lasagne made with oatmeal

Although the type of research shown above is extremely useful and to be applauded, we may be missing a vital point, oats that are genetically modified, or not as Nature intended, are probably going to be just as toxic to them as wheat is.   

It is also worth adding that a high proportion of these people are women, they are also ‘sensitives’ – tuned into the great spiritual beyond. 

The more sensitive, the worse it is, so if we are moving in to a new spiritual age, the one thing we need to get rid of is GM food, and man made chemicals. [Unless of course it is back to 'witch hunts' using GM foods and pharmaceuticals  instead!!].

Other uses for oats

Although the principle use of oats is food, they have been used for other purposes.  Winter oats have been used as groundcover and ploughed under in the spring as a green fertilizer.  They have also been used for pasture; they can be grazed a while, then allowed to head out for grain production, or grazed continuously until other pastures are ready.  Oat straw is prized by cattle and horse producers as bedding, due to its soft, relatively dust-free, and absorbent nature.

Tied in a muslin bag, oat straw was used to soften bath water.  Oat extract has also been used to soothe skin conditions and to make soap. 

Rice straw is used as a chelation agent and has been most effective at removing a number of heavy metals – some of them extremely dangerous – from polluted water supplies.  There is some very new research into whether oat straw has the same capability.  The following paper is about rice straw, but the principles are much the same – does it absorb metals and what can be absorbed?

Cadmium is the most common toxic metal threatening safe rice supply. Rice straw has the potential to remove Cd from large-scale effluent contaminated by heavy metals since it exhibited a short biosorption equilibrium time of 5 min, high biosorption capacity (13.9 mg g(-1)) and high removal efficiency at a pH range of 2.0-6.0. PMID:  22445266

 

 

Method

Oats have numerous uses in foods; most commonly, they are rolled or crushed into oatmeal, or ground into fine oat flour. They are used in porridge, desserts, oatcakes, oatmeal cookies and oat bread. Oat bread was first manufactured in Britain, where the first oat bread factory was established in 1899.  Oats are also an ingredient in many cold cereals, in particular muesli and granola

Biscuits

They make very nice biscuits with added herbs and spices that can be used with cheese and celery.

Porridge

Oatmeal and rolled oats can be made into porridge.  Traditional Scottish porridge is eaten in Scotland with salt.  In England it is eaten with very liberal quantities of double cream and a lot of either rich brown sugar or heather honey.  Occasionally a little whiskey is added.  They are made of sterner stuff in Scotland. [I jest]

Haggis

Haggis is a lot nicer than it sounds.  Cold haggis, once cooked, can be fried with bacon and eggs for breakfast.

BBC Food
Haggis is a traditional Scottish sausage made from a sheep’s stomach stuffed with diced sheep’s liver, lungs and heart, oatmeal, onion, suet and seasoning. Most haggis is part-cooked before being sold and needs to be simmered in boiling water for one to two hours. Haggis is traditionally served with ‘neeps ‘n’ tatties’ – mashed swede and potatoes – and whisky on Burns Night

Herring

Herring rolled in oatmeal is delicious.  The oatmeal absorbs the oils from the fish and goes very crunchy and tangy

Hugh Fearnley-Whittinstall’s Herring in oatmeal with bacon

2 herring, filleted

A little milk

Salt and ground black pepper

100g medium oatmeal

1 tbsp sunflower or groundnut oil

4 rashers streaky bacon, cut into lardons

 

Brush the fish fillets with milk and season well.
Spread the oatmeal on a plate. Coat the herring in the oatmeal, pressing it on to the fish firmly.
Heat a large, heavy-based frying pan over a medium heat, add the oil, then fry the bacon until crisp and golden. Remove with a slotted spoon.
 Keeping the pan (and fat) over a medium heat, lay in the coated fillets flesh side down. Fry for a minute, then turn over and fry for one to two minutes more, until the skin under the oatmeal is golden.

Serve straightaway with the bacon, some bread and butter and a salad; or, if you want to make a breakfast of it, with a fried egg on the side.

 

 

Ice cream

this must be one of the nicest home made ice creams you can make

Iced Athol Brose

1 oz oatmeal
2 tbs honey
3 tbs whisky
½ pt of double cream

Spread the oatmeal on a baking sheet/tin and bake in a medium oven for about 10 minutes until it is pale brown, shaking the tin occasionally so that it browns evenly.
Warm the honey and the whisky together, cool and blend into the lightly whipped cream.
Fold in the oatmeal.

Freeze in serving dish or dishes.

Serve straight from the freezer

 

Havreskjering_Fossheim_Lindahl

 

Desserts

Sweet oat biscuits, which can be bought ready cooked form the basis of a number of traditional desserts in both Scotland and the UK as a whole:

 

 

Cranachan

½ packet ready-made honey and oat biscuits, lightly crushed

Rhubarb or Blackcurrants [ cooked and sieved]

3 tbsp clear honey

150ml/¼ pint double cream, whipped until soft peaks form when the whisk is removed

Fresh orange juice

 

Place a quarter of the crushed biscuits into the base of a tall dessert glass.

Drizzle over one tablespoon of honey
Add two tablespoons of blackcurrants/cooked rhubarb. Top with a third of the whipped cream mixed with orange juice.

Repeat the layering process twice with the remaining ingredients.

To serve, sprinkle the remaining crushed biscuits over the top of the dessert.

 

 And here is a recipe for Ginger and mascarpone cheesecake with chocolate sauce and praline from the BBC:

Cheesecake

50g/2oz butter, melted

100g/3½oz oat biscuits, crushed

100g/3½oz mascarpone

100ml/3½fl oz whipped cream

1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated

2 tbsp honey

****************

For the sauce

2 tbsp cocoa powder

2 tsp caster sugar

2 tbsp water

***********

For the praline

50g/2oz caster sugar

100g hazelnuts, chopped

 

 

Place the melted butter, ginger and biscuit crumbs into a bowl and mix well.

Place a 7cm/3in chefs' ring onto a plate and add the biscuit mixture, pressing down well to form a compact base.

Place the mascarpone, cream, ginger and honey in a clean bowl and mix well.
 Spoon the mascarpone cream mixture into the ring mould onto the biscuit base and smooth over the top.

For the sauce, place all of the sauce ingredients into a saucepan over a medium heat and stir until thick glossy sauce is formed.

For the praline, add the sugar and nuts to a separate saucepan over a medium heat and caramelise gently.

Pour the caramelised nuts out onto a non-stick baking sheet, spread out and leave to cool. Once cooled and set, smash the praline into pieces with a toffee hammer or a rolling pin.

To serve, carefully remove the chefs' ring from the cheesecake, drizzle over the chocolate sauce and sprinkle with praline pieces.

 

Rosemary & oat biscuits with cheese

Beer

In both Britain and Belgium, they are sometimes used for brewing beer. Oatmeal stout, for example, is one variety brewed using a percentage of oats for the wort.
According to Wikipedia “The more rarely used oat malt is produced by the Thomas Fawcett & Sons Maltings and was used in the Maclay Oat Malt Stout before Maclays Brewery ceased independent brewing operations.  Oatmeal caudle, made of ale and oatmeal with spices, was a traditional British drink and a favourite of Oliver Cromwell.”

 

 

Soft drinks

 A cold, sweet drink called avena made of ground oats and milk is a popular refreshment throughout Latin America.

 

Nutrients

USDA Full Report (All Nutrients):  20038, Oats

Scientific Name:  Avena sativa L.


Nutrient

Unit

Value per 100g

Water

g

8.22

Energy

kcal

389

Energy

kJ

1628

Protein

g

16.89

Total lipid (fat)

g

6.90

Ash

g

1.72

Carbohydrate, by difference

g

66.27

Fiber, total dietary

g

10.6

MINERALS

 

 

Calcium, Ca

mg

54

Iron, Fe

mg

4.72

Magnesium, Mg

mg

177

Phosphorus, P

mg

523

Potassium, K

mg

429

Sodium, Na

mg

2

Zinc, Zn

mg

3.97

Copper, Cu

mg

0.626

Manganese, Mn

mg

4.916

VITAMINS

 

 

Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid

mg

0.0

Thiamin

mg

0.763

Riboflavin

mg

0.139

Niacin

mg

0.961

Pantothenic acid

mg

1.349

Vitamin B-6

mg

0.119

Folate, total

µg

56

Folic acid

µg

0

Folate, food

µg

56

Folate, DFE

µg

56

Vitamin B-12

µg

0.00

Vitamin B-12, added

µg

0.00

Vitamin A, RAE

µg

0

Retinol

µg

0

Vitamin A, IU

IU

0

Vitamin D (D2 + D3)

µg

0.0

Vitamin D

IU

0

FATTY ACIDS

 

 

Fatty acids, total saturated

g

1.217

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated

g

2.178

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated

g

2.535

AMINO ACIDS

 

 

Tryptophan

g

0.234

Threonine

g

0.575

Isoleucine

g

0.694

Leucine

g

1.284

Lysine

g

0.701

Methionine

g

0.312

Cystine

g

0.408

Phenylalanine

g

0.895

Tyrosine

g

0.573

Valine

g

0.937

Arginine

g

1.192

Histidine

g

0.405

Alanine

g

0.881

Aspartic acid

g

1.448

Glutamic acid

g

3.712

Glycine

g

0.841

Proline

g

0.934

Serine

g

0.750

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