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AwoFa'lokun Fatunmbi - Making rain and lightning

Identifier

011334

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

In 1989 David Wilson, who has an academic background in law, traveled to southwest Nigeria where he became a member of Egbe Ifa Ogun ti Ode Remo which is a society of Yoruba diviners living in the west African rain forest. At this time he was given the name AwoFa'lokun Fatunmbi and has continued his study of traditional Yoruba spirituality on four subsequent trips to Nigeria. This tradition is called Ifa. Awo Fa'lokun Fatunmbi has written three books on Ifa,

  • Iwa Pele: Ifa Quest the Search of the sources of Santeria and Lucumi,
  • Awo: Ifa and the Theology of Orisa divination,
  • Iba se Orjisa: Ifa Proverbs, Folktales, Sacred History and Prayer.

A description of the experience

The PK Man Seen From an African Perspective - Awo Fa'lokun Fatunmbi

I have been fortunate over the past ten years to have had the opportunity to study the shamanism used in the rain forest of southwestern Nigeria. This is the traditional home of the Yoruba Nation which is one of the largest cultural groups in Western Africa consisting of over twenty million Yoruba speaking people. The shamanism of southwestern Nigeria is called "Ifa" which means "wisdom of nature"…….

Shamanistic Weather Control

…. In Ifa the invocation of lightning is used as an instrument of warfare. There are very specific and detailed rituals that are designed to produce and direct this natural phenomena.
I have personally witnessed enough examples of Ifa initiates invoking changes in the weather that it now seems normal rather than abnormal.

From a parapsychological perspective claims of effecting the weather result in a debate between two possible explanations.

One explanation is that the person has a telekinetic influence on conditions that produce the weather and the other is that the person has powers of precognition and is simply predicting events while claiming to exert some form of control.

From an Ifa perspective these two points of view are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Ifa makes extensive use of a variety of divination systems that are used to predict the future. If a predicted future event is deemed favourable, rituals will be performed to insure that the anticipated good fortune becomes manifest.

If a predicted future event is deemed unfavourable, rituals will be performed in an effort to alter fate. To me this ritual process suggests that there is an interactive relationship between precognition and telekinesis that does not appear to have been fully explored by Western scientist who research paranormal phenomena. This polarity would be extremely difficult to analyse in a laboratory setting. In personal terms it is the polarity between optimism that generates good luck and pessimism that generates bad luck.

Based on my own experience I have seen shamans invoke rain and watch the rain manifest. I have seen shamans invoke the spirit of lighting while their invocations were punctuated by bolts of lightning hurling across the sky. I have seen shamans command the wind to blow and demand that it stop.

On one occasion a wind storm disrupted a ceremony that I was participating in, and the Ifa initiate who was leading the ceremony poked his head out of the door of the room that we were in and yelled at the wind to stop blowing. The wind stopped until after we had finished.

When I asked how he did that, he answered; "You have to believe that you can." This answer is not flip. Believing that you can means that you have worked through doubt, fear, hesitation, and confusion. These are all emotions that would restrict access to ase or inhibit the manifestation of kundalini (as it is known in the yogic traditions).

The source of the experience

African tribal

Concepts, symbols and science items

Symbols

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Commonsteps

References