Suppression

Rose hips

Category: Food

Type

Voluntary

Introduction and description

 

The rose hip, also known as rose haw, is the fruit of the rose plant, that typically is red-to-orange, but ranges from dark purple to black in some species. Rose hips begin to form after successful pollination of flowers in spring or early summer, and ripen in late summer through autumn.  They can be classified as a berry, as such one would expect them to be nutritious and possibly medically helpful as well, as many berries are.

When we were young, my mother and father used to bicycle with us into the countryside at the weekend,  and gather great bags of the hips of wild roses - the so called dog rose - whose delicate white flowers had graced the hedgerows in Summer.

On returning home, my Mum would get out a big jam pan and boil up the rose hips with sugar and make two things - rosehip jelly, which we used to have on toast for afternoon tea on cold winter days, and rosehip syrup which she bottled.  The syrup was quite concentrated and used for coughs and colds, although my brother liked it so much it often used to be poured over ice cream as a treat.

It is delicious, and it contains a very high amount of Vitamin C, plus minerals and other vitamins, as such it is a very special food.

We were born just after World War II and the gathering of rose hips had been a necessity in the War.  As Wikipedia explains:

the people of Britain were encouraged through letters to The Times newspaper, articles in the British Medical Journal, and pamphlets produced by Claire Loewenfeld, a dietitian working for Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children, to gather wild-grown rose hips to make a vitamin C syrup for children. This advice arose because German submarines were sinking commercial ships, making it difficult to import citrus fruits

Nutrients

 

The following table comes from the USDA Nutrients database, it is the only analysis we could find that goes into detail. 

Full Report (All Nutrients)35203, Rose Hips, wild (Northern Plains Indians) :  Sources of Data  Nutrient Data Laboratory, ARS, USDA National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program, Wave 9j, 2005  Beltsville MD  


Nutrient

Unit

Value per 100g

Water

g

58.66

Energy

kcal

162

Energy

kJ

679

Protein

g

1.60

Total lipid (fat)

g

0.34

Ash

g

1.18

Carbohydrate, by difference

g

38.22

Fiber, total dietary

g

24.1

SUGARS

 

 

Sugars, total

g

2.58

Sucrose

g

0.07

Glucose (dextrose)

g

1.34

Fructose

g

1.16

Lactose

g

0.00

Maltose

g

0.00

Galactose

g

0.00

MINERALS

 

 

Calcium, Ca

mg

169

Iron, Fe

mg

1.06

Magnesium, Mg

mg

69

Phosphorus, P

mg

61

Potassium, K

mg

429

Sodium, Na

mg

4

Zinc, Zn

mg

0.25

Copper, Cu

mg

0.113

Manganese, Mn

mg

1.020

VITAMINS

 

 

Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid

mg

426.0

Thiamin

mg

0.016

Riboflavin

mg

0.166

Niacin

mg

1.300

Pantothenic acid

mg

0.800

Vitamin B-6

mg

0.076

Folate, total

µg

3

Folate, food

µg

3

Choline, total

mg

12.0

Betaine

mg

2.9

Vitamin A, RAE

µg

217

Carotene, beta

µg

2350

Carotene, alpha

µg

31

Cryptoxanthin, beta

µg

483

Vitamin A, IU

IU

4345

Lycopene

µg

6800

Lutein + zeaxanthin

µg

2001

Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)

mg

5.84

Tocopherol, beta

mg

0.05

Tocopherol, gamma

mg

1.34

Tocopherol, delta

mg

0.14

Vitamin K (phylloquinone)

µg

25.9

Method

Rosehip vinegar delicious with chicken livers

Rose hips are used for herbal teas, jam, jelly, syrup, rose hip soup, wine, and marmalade. They are not nice raw and generally they are best boiled with sugar and then sieved or better put through a 'jelly bag', as this makes a lovely smooth syrup without the seeds and hairs inside the fruit.

The old Damask roses and the wild rose seem to produce the best flavours, and they also seem to produce the most nutrients.  It is possible the old fashioned scrambler and rambler roses - being very close relatives of the original dog rose - may also be as nutritious and flavoursome, but we have not tested this theory.

Rose hips can be used dried in a herbal tea, blended with hibiscus.

Rosehip and crab apple jelly

Rosehip and apple jelly

  • 2 lb/900g rosehips
  • 4 lb/1800g of sweet eating apples. We use windfalls as they won’t keep
  • Zest of half a lemon (add to the apples)
  • Juice of half a lemon (strained). Half a medium lemon equates to one tablespoon of juice.
  • 1pt/600ml of strained juice to 1lb/454g of white granulated sugar

This recipe makes 14 half pound jars. So adjust accordingly.

 Method: 

The apples and rosehips are cooked separately as they take different times to cook.
Remove stalks from the rosehips and place in a large stainless steel or glass pan. Barely cover the hips with water and bring to the boil.  Simmer gently until the hips are soft. Stir from time to time. Top up with water if necessary.
Wash the apples, cut out bad bits and chop roughly. There is no need to peel or core the apples. In a separate pan add the apples and water to cover. Add the lemon zest. Bring slowly to the boil and simmer very gently until all the fruit is soft and squishy.
Pour the cooked fruit into a large sterilised muslin ‘jelly bag’, double lined, hung over a large clean bucket or bowl [hang the bag between the legs of an upturned stool].
Leave the jelly bag to drip overnight (minimum 12 hours).
Measure the quantity of juice obtained, then pour the juice into a deep heavy bottomed saucepan.
Add 1lb/454g of white granulated sugar for each 1pt/570ml of juice.  Add the lemon juice.
Heat the juice and sugar gently stirring from time to time, make sure that all the sugar has dissolved before bringing the liquid slowly to the boil.
Boil for about 10 minutes then test for a set. Test every 3 to 5 minutes until setting point is reached. A set is reached when the liquid gels on a cool plate.  This should not take long as the apples have pectin in them which helps setting.
When jelly has reached setting point pour into warm sterilised jars using a funnel and ladle.
When slightly cooled, cover immediately with plastic lined screw top lids or waxed disks and cellophane tops secured with a rubber band.
Label when cold and store in a cool, dark place. Away from damp.

They can also be used to make rose hip wine. Rose hip soup, "nyponsoppa", is especially popular in Sweden. Rhodomel, a type of mead, is made with rose hips.

 

Rosehip wine

  • 8oz rosehips
  • ½ pint white grape juice concentrate
  • 2 ¼ lb white sugar
  • ½ teaspoon tannin
  • Yeast [wine]
  • I lemon chopped or 1 teaspoon citric acid
  • Water to one gallon

Wash rosehips and pour 3 quarts boiling water on them in plastic bucket
When cool stir in other ingredients, cover with cloth
Ferment for at least 7 days, then strain through double jelly bag, leaving overnight
Top up with remaining water [to taste]
Ferment as usual in fermentation jar with bung and lock

Optional extra: Dried and chopped figs make an interesting addition to this wine and sugar can be replaced by honey

 

Rose hips can also be used to make palinka, a traditional Hungarian alcoholic beverage, popular in Hungary, Romania, and other countries sharing Austro-Hungarian history.

Rose hips are also the central ingredient of cockta, the fruity-tasting national soft drink of Slovenia.

The River Cottage Rosehip syrup recipe [Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall]

Rosehips are, of course, a fruit the same family as apples in fact and this classic autumn hedgerow syrup has a unique and lovely flavour: warm, floral and fruity. This method is the simplest and best I've found for making rosehip syrup. Double-straining ensures that the tiny, irritant hairs found inside rosehips are removed.
Method
Sterilise a couple of bottles and vinegar-proof screw-tops or stoppers by washing thoroughly in hot soapy water, rinsing well, then putting them on a tray in a low oven (at 120°C/Gas 1⁄2) to dry out and heat up.
Roughly chop the rosehips in a food processor in batches, then transfer to a large saucepan and add 1.25 litres water.
Bring to the boil, then turn the heat down and simmer for around 15 minutes.
Strain through a double layer of muslin, letting the pulp sit for a good half hour so that all the juice passes through.

 

Wash out the muslin, or cut a fresh piece, fold to double it and pass the strained juice through it again.
Measure the rosehip juice into a large saucepan.
For every 500ml, add 325g sugar.
Heat slowly, stirring, until the sugar has dissolved, then bring to the boil and boil for 3 minutes, skimming off any scum if necessary.
Decant immediately into the prepared bottles and seal.
Label when the bottles have cooled completely.
Use within 4 months and refrigerate once opened.

Try it for breakfast trickled over porridge, pancakes, drop scones or eggy bread; use it to sweeten plain yoghurt (with some chopped apple if you like); or for a delicious pud, trickle it on to hot or cold rice pudding or good vanilla ice cream

 

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