Suppression

Cream

Category: Food

Type

Voluntary

Introduction and description

Cream is covered under the more generic heading of Dairy products, as butter, cheese, cream and milk all derive from the same source, however, it may be helpful to see the specific nutrient content of cream.  The following table describes double cream [I believe this is called heavy cream in the USA].

 

 

Source: National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference
Release 26   Software v.1.3.1
Nutrient values and weights are for edible portion

Nutrient

Unit


Value per 100 g

 

Proximates

Water

g

57.71

 

Energy

kcal

345

 

Protein

g

2.05

 

Total lipid (fat)

g

37.00

 

Carbohydrate, by difference

g

2.79

 

Fiber, total dietary

g

0.0

 

Sugars, total

g

2.79

 

Minerals

Calcium, Ca

mg

65

 

Iron, Fe

mg

0.03

 

Magnesium, Mg

mg

7

 

Phosphorus, P

mg

62

 

Potassium, K

mg

75

 

Sodium, Na

mg

38

 

Zinc, Zn

mg

0.23

 

Vitamins

Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid

mg

0.6

 

Thiamin

mg

0.022

 

Riboflavin

mg

0.110

 

Niacin

mg

0.039

 

Vitamin B-6

mg

0.026

 

Folate, DFE

µg

4

 

Vitamin B-12

µg

0.18

 

Vitamin A, RAE

µg

411

 

Vitamin A, IU

IU

1470

 

Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)

mg

1.06

 

Vitamin D (D2 + D3)

µg

0.7

 

Vitamin D

IU

27

 

Vitamin K (phylloquinone)

µg

3.2

 

Lipids

Fatty acids, total saturated

g

23.032

 

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated

g

10.686

 

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated

g

1.374

 

Cholesterol

mg

137

 

Other

Caffeine

mg

0

 

Method

The majority of the recipes for dairy products are to be found in this section, but as this is a particularly rich and creamy dish, we have included it here.

To this can be added sliced boiled potatoes, or cooked chicken, or pre-cooked bacon snipped into pieces.  It is also possible to add cooked macaroni in which case it becomes Creamy Cheese and macaroni.  As such this is a very versatile recipe with all sorts of possibilities for ringing the changes.

Creamy leeks

6 large leeks
2 cloves of garlic
5 sprigs of fresh thyme
olive oil
1 knob of unsalted butter
100 ml single or double cream
100 g Cheddar cheese
50 g Parmesan cheese
100 g Brie
Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/gas 4.
Trim, wash and slice the leeks, about 2cm thick, at an angle. Peel and slice the garlic, then pick the thyme leaves.
Put a large casserole-type pan (ideally one you’d be happy to serve in) on a medium heat and add a drizzle of oil, the butter, thyme leaves and garlic.
Cook until it begins to bubble and fry, then stir in the leeks. Continue cooking and checking on it every few minutes to stir and make sure it doesn’t catch.
At this point, you have two choices: one is good, one is great. You can either stir the rest of the ingredients into the leeks, grating in the Cheddar and Parmesan, and tearing in the brie, then put it into the oven to cook for 45 minutes uncovered, or, if you want the sweetest leeks in the world (and I think you do), do the following...
Turn the heat under the pan down a little and cook the leeks for about 35 minutes, or until soft and intensely gorgeous, stirring every now and then.
Season, then spoon it all into a dish, or leave in the pan.
Stir in the cream and splash of water, grate over the Cheddar and Parmesan, then pull the brie into parts and bomb those on top.
Pop in the oven for 15 minutes, or until golden and bubbling.

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