Overload

Brain haemorrhage

Category: Illness or disabilities

Type

Involuntary

Introduction and description

 

There are two main types of brain haemorhage.  A cerebral haemorrhage or haemorrhage (or intracerebral haemorrhage, ICH) is a type of intracranial haemorrhage that occurs within the brain tissue itself. This contrasts with the other category of intracranial haemorrhages, which all occur within the skull but outside of the brain tissue. From our point of view they both have the same effects and work to give you a spiritual experience via the damage caused to the brain.

As with all types of haemorrhages within the skull, they are a serious medical emergency, because they can increase intracranial pressure, which, if left untreated, can lead to coma and death. The mortality rate for intraparenchymal bleeds is over 40%.

Symptoms

 

Patients with brain haemorrhaging have symptoms that correspond to the functions controlled by the area of the brain that is damaged by the bleed.

Other symptoms include those that indicate a rise in intracranial pressure due to a large mass putting pressure on the brain.

A severe headache followed by vomiting is one of the more common symptoms. Some patients may also go into a coma.

 

Causes

Intracerebral haemorrhage can be caused by brain trauma, or it can occur 'spontaneously'. Non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage is a spontaneous bleeding into the brain tissue.

I will now quote from the medical literature.

"There are many possible causes of brain haemorhaging, these include:

 

  • High blood pressure
  • Penetrating head trauma
  • Depressed skull fractures
  • Acceleration-deceleration trauma
  • Rupture of an aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation (AVM)
  • Bleeding within a tumour
  • Amyloid angiopathy
  • Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis"

But these are just reasons why the haemorrhage might have occurred at that point. 

None of these really explain why there should be a tumour, or high blood pressure, or an aneurism. 

In layman's language, all this is saying is that the haemorrhage might be caused by a bang on the head, trauma to the head of another sort, or 'spontaneously'. If we look at actual case studies of haemorrhage, as opposed to the generic description given in text books, we find that the 'spontaneous unknown reason' can be emotional shock - high levels of emotion - which causes a rise in blood pressure and dislodges the gunge on the walls of the blood vessels, sending it off to the brain.

We also find that there is often another medical condition, that we and the medical community had not spotted, that was the real cause of the haemorrhage - problems with the blood circulatory system, or problems in the brain itself - brain damage.

Let me take Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) as an example.  An angiopathy is the generic term for a disease of the blood vessels (arteries, veins, and capillaries).  An amyloid is a type of deposit which forms in the walls of the blood vessels of the central nervous system. Amyloid material is only found in the brain, they usually find it by looking through a microscope at various lesions in the brain.

So, it is a disease of the blood vessels in the brain - problems with the blood circulatory system, which has caused brain damage.

What we should be asking is why are the amyloids there?

 

 

There is a common thread now running through this website, geared towards finding the true cause of illnesses as opposed to conditions that in themselves are simply symptoms. 

Although the true individual causes of any one person's blood circulatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis or brain damage such as tumours or Parkinson's disease differ, the types of cause are the same for every disease and can be summed up by the 'cause baby', a simple picture I have used a number of times to show the main causes of all disease.

 In effect, brain haemorrhage is caused by brain damage and/or blood circulatory system disease , which was itself caused by:

Although there is great emphasis being placed in scientific literature these days to the role inherited genes may play, this does not in itself provide a cause.   The assumption that just because many people in a family have the same illness or disease, it must be genetic, is not correct;  it could equally well indicate exposure to the same environmental pathogen or stressor.  Furthermore, if genes are damaged or changed, they have to be damaged or changed by something.  And the main culprits at the moment are radiation, viruses and nanoparticles.

How it works

Why do people get spiritual experiences from brain haemorrhages? 

A brain haemorhage knocks out function, and by knocking out function, some of those functions may be the ones preventing experience.  At a more generic level, however, it may simply be that a brain haemorrhage is an enormous threat to the person.  In effect, if we look at this from a logical point of view, the Will is being assaulted by a Threat of extraordinary proportions.

You now need to have the Model of the Mind open and have read How spiritual experience works.

The 5 senses along possibly with the nervous system are telling it that it is in danger, that the threat is both real and enormous.  Thus the Will is being told DO SOMETHING. 

But if a person has had a brain haemorrhage, the Will can actually do nothing.  The functions of the brain are being attacked and since many of these functions work the body, the body itself will be sending messages too  – 'THREAT ,THREAT ,THREAT – we are about to die captain we don’t want to go with you, your little cells and organs want to live'.

There is little input from the Reasoning function – after all what can it do?  And the intensity of the messages being sent it from Perceptions is overwhelming – 'DO SOMETHING, DO SOMETHING!!!'  And there comes a point where the Will gives up, exhausted, and lets the Composer take over.  The ego has been squashed.

And we get our spiritual experience.

 

 

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