Suppression

Oyster mushrooms

Category: Food

Type

Voluntary

Introduction and description

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Oyster mushrooms-Pleurotus citrinopileatus

Pleurotus is a genus of gilled mushrooms which includes one of the most widely eaten mushrooms, P. ostreatus.

Species of Pleurotus may be called oyster, abalone, or tree mushrooms, and are some of the most commonly cultivated edible mushrooms in the world.

This genus has approximately 40 species.  In addition to their nutritional value, they too possess medicinal properties, one key one of which is anti-inflammatory activity.  Yet again, most of the very useful activity seems to revolve around their anti-viral and anti-bacterial properties – their ability to fight pathogens.  A number are chelation agents.

Pleurotus fungi, for example, have been used in mycoremediation of pollutants such as petroleum and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

The family name comes from their shape.  Pleurotus means "side ear", from Greek πλευρή (pleurē), "side"+ ὠτός (ōtos), genitive of οὖς (ous), "ear", referring to the way they grow on trees.

 

 

 

Nutrients

The following table was extracted from the USDA Nutrients database

Full Report (All Nutrients):  11987, Mushrooms, oyster, raw 
Scientific Name:  Pleurotus ostreatus

1Nutrient Data Laboratory, ARS, USDA Nutrient content of ethnic and geographic specific foods, Southern Testing and Research Laboratories , 1995  Beltsville MD  
2Mushroom Council National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program Wave 9b , 2004  Dublin CA  
3Mushroom Council National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program Wave 13d , 2009  Dublin CA  
4Arabbi, P. R., Genovese, M. I., and Lajolo, F. M.  Flavonoids in vegetable foods commonly consumed in Brazil and estimated ingestion by the Brazilian population. , 2004 J. Agric. Food Chem. 52 5   pp.1124-1131
5Howard, L. R., Talcott, S. T., Brenes, C. H., and Villalon, B.  Changes in phytochemical and antioxidant activity of selected pepper cultivars (Capsicum species) as influenced by maturity , 2000 J. Agric. Food Chem. 48   pp.1713-1720
6Kevers, C., Falkowski, M., Tabart, J., Defraigne, J-O., Dommes, J., and Pincemail, J.  Evolution of antioxidant capacity during storage of selected fruits and vegetables, 2007 J. Agric. Food Chem. 55   pp.8596-8603

 

NUTRIENT

Unit

Value per 100g

Water 1 2 3

g

89.18

Energy

kcal

33

Energy

kJ

139

Protein 1 2

g

3.31

Total lipid (fat) 1 2

g

0.41

Ash 1 2

g

1.01

Carbohydrate, by difference

g

6.09

Fiber, total dietary 1 2

g

2.3

Sugars, total 2

g

1.11

Sucrose 2

g

0.00

Glucose (dextrose) 2

g

1.11

Fructose 2

g

0.00

Lactose 2

g

0.00

Maltose 2

g

0.00

Galactose 2

g

0.00

Starch 2

g

0.00

MINERALS

 

 

Calcium, Ca 1 2

mg

3

Iron, Fe 1 2

mg

1.33

Magnesium, Mg 1 2

mg

18

Phosphorus, P 1 2

mg

120

Potassium, K 1 2

mg

420

Sodium, Na 1 2

mg

18

Zinc, Zn 1 2

mg

0.77

Copper, Cu 1 2

mg

0.244

Manganese, Mn 1 2

mg

0.113

Selenium, Se 2

µg

2.6

VITAMINS

 

 

Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid 2

mg

0.0

Thiamin 1 2

mg

0.125

Riboflavin 1 2

mg

0.349

Niacin 1 2

mg

4.956

Pantothenic acid 1 2

mg

1.294

Vitamin B-6 1 2

mg

0.110

Folate, total b 1 2 3

µg

38

Folic acid

µg

0

Folate, food b 3

µg

38

Folate, DFE b

µg

38

Choline, total 2

mg

48.7

Betaine 2

mg

12.1

Vitamin B-12

µg

0.00

Vitamin A, RAE

µg

2

Retinol

µg

0

Carotene, beta 1

µg

29

Carotene, alpha

µg

0

Cryptoxanthin, beta

µg

0

Vitamin A, IU

IU

48

Lycopene

µg

0

Lutein + zeaxanthin

µg

0

Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) 2

mg

0.00

Tocopherol, beta 2

mg

0.00

Tocopherol, gamma 2

mg

0.00

Tocopherol, delta 2

mg

0.00

Vitamin D (D2 + D3)

µg

0.7

Vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) 3

µg

0.7

Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) 3

µg

0.0

Vitamin D 3

IU

29

Vitamin K (phylloquinone) 2

µg

0.0

FATTY ACIDS

 

 

Fatty acids, total saturated

g

0.062

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated

g

0.031

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated

g

0.123

Fatty acids, total trans

g

0.000

AMINO ACIDS

 

 

Tryptophan 2

g

0.042

Threonine 2

g

0.140

Isoleucine 2

g

0.112

Leucine 2

g

0.168

Lysine 2

g

0.126

Methionine 2

g

0.042

Cystine 2

g

0.028

Phenylalanine 2

g

0.112

Tyrosine 2

g

0.084

Valine 2

g

0.197

Arginine 2

g

0.182

Histidine 2

g

0.070

Alanine 2

g

0.239

Aspartic acid 2

g

0.295

Glutamic acid 2

g

0.632

Glycine 2

g

0.126

Proline 2

g

0.042

Serine 2

g

0.126

 

 

References and further reading

  • Jayakumar T., Sakthivel M., Thomas P. A., Geraldine P. Pleurotus ostreatus, an oyster mushroom, decreases the oxidative stress induced by carbon tetrachloride in rat kidneys, heart and brain. Chemico-Biological Interactions. 2008;176(2-3):108–120. doi: 10.1016/j.cbi.2008.08.006.
  • Jedinak A., Sliva D. Pleurotus ostreatus inhibits proliferation of human breast and colon cancer cells through p53-dependent as well as p53-independent pathway. International Journal of Oncology. 2008;33(6):1307–1313. doi: 10.3892/ijo_00000122.
  • Lavi I., Friesem D., Geresh S., Hadar Y., Schwartz B. An aqueous polysaccharide extract from the edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus induces anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on HT-29 colon cancer cells. Cancer Letters. 2006;244(1):61–70. doi: 10.1016/j.canlet.2005.12.007.
  • Mishra K. K., Pal R. S., Arunkumar R., Chandrashekara C., Jain S. K., Bhatt J. C. Antioxidant properties of different edible mushroom species and increased bioconversion efficiency of Pleurotus eryngii using locally available casing materials. Food Chemistry. 2013;138(2-3):1557–1563. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.12.001.
  • Mori K., Kobayashi C., Tomita T., Inatomi S., Ikeda M. Antiatherosclerotic effect of the edible mushrooms Pleurotus eryngii (Eringi), Grifola frondosa (Maitake), and Hypsizygus marmoreus (Bunashimeji) in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Nutrition Research. 2008;28(5):335–342. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2008.03.010.
  • Jagadish L. K., Shenbhagaraman R., Venkatakrishnan V., Kaviyarasan V. Studies on the phytochemical, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of three indigenous Pleurotus species. Journal of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology. 2008;1:20–29.
  • Jedinak A., Dudhgaonkar S., Wu Q.-L., Simon J., Sliva D. Anti-inflammatory activity of edible oyster mushroom is mediated through the inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 signaling. Nutrition Journal. 2011;10, article 52 doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-10-52.
  • Kanagasabapathy G., Malek S. N. A., Kuppusamy U. R., Vikineswary S. Chemical composition and antioxidant properties of extracts of fresh fruiting bodies of Pleurotus sajor-caju (Fr.) singer. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 2011;59(6):2618–2626. doi: 10.1021/jf104133g.
  • Smiderle F. R., Olsen L. M., Carbonero E. R., et al. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties in a rodent model of a (1→3),(1→6)-linked β-glucan isolated from Pleurotus pulmonarius. European Journal of Pharmacology. 2008;597(1–3):86–91. doi: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2008.08.028.
  • Tong H., Xia F., Feng K., et al. Structural characterization and in vitro antitumor activity of a novel polysaccharide isolated from the fruiting bodies of Pleurotus ostreatus. Bioresource Technology. 2009;100(4):1682–1686. doi: 10.1016/j.biortech.2008.09.004.
  • Bobek P., Ozdín L., Galbavý Š. Dose- and time-dependent hypocholesterolemic effect of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) in rats. Nutrition. 1998;14(3):282–286. doi: 10.1016/s0899-9007(97)00471-1.