Suppression

Fruit malt loaf

Category: Food

Type

Voluntary

Introduction and description

 

Malt loaf is one of the few combination foods we have included on the site. 

It is a sort of soft sweet chewy kind of bread, filled with dried fruit, and, as its name suggests, made with malt. 

Malt loaf is usually eaten sliced and spread with butter. 

It was a common teatime staple in my youth, when lunches were substantial and the main meal of the day, and in the evening we had supper or ‘high tea’. 

Tea was then malt loaf, crumpets or muffins, scones, butter, cakes, home-made jam and the drink tea.

Similar loaves and buns are available in Europe, Scandinavia and Russia.  The bread may be lighter or heavier than that in the UK, and there may be variations created by adding different sorts of fruit or even spices such as cloves and cinnamon.  Ultimately however they all make the bread using malt.

 

The reason it is on the site is that it is exceptionally nutritious and could make an ideal substitute for bread in a child’s lunch box sandwiches.

Given the problems of manufactured bread and non organic wheat, then this becomes particularly pertinent, as malt loaf can be made with organic flour. 

When we would tramp across the hills round us, we used to take cheese and malt loaf sandwiches and an apple for lunch. 

Nutrients

 

The nutrients and their quantities depend on the recipe, but if we take a standard recipe [provided below] and ignore the quantities then we can produce a table like that shown below. 

The minerals, vitamins and amino acids are shown in the left column and the ingredients are across the top. 

A cross is used to show that ingredient has that nutrient.  The information comes from the USDA nutrient database.

nutrient database.

NUTRIENT

Eggs

Malt

Sun

flower oil

Raisins [dried fruit]

Flour [Wheat oats or barley]

SUMMARY

Energy

X

X

X

X

X

X

Protein

X

X

-

X

X

X

Total lipid (fat)

X

 

X

X

X

X

Fiber, total dietary

-

 

-

X

X

X

SUGARS

 

X

 

 

 

X

Sucrose

-

 

-

X

X

X

Glucose  (dextrose)

X

 

-

X

 

X

Fructose

-

 

-

X

X

X

Lactose

-

 

-

-

 

-

Maltose

-

X

-

-

 

X

Galactose

-

 

-

-

 

-

MINERALS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calcium, Ca

X

X

-

X

X

X

Iron, Fe

X

X

-

X

X

X

Magnesium, Mg

X

X

-

X

X

X

Phosphorus, P

X

X

-

X

X

X

Potassium, K

X

X

-

X

X

X

Sodium, Na

X

X

-

X

X

X

Zinc, Zn

X

X

-

X

X

X

Copper, Cu

X

X

-

X

X

X

Manganese, Mn

X

X

-

X

X

X

Selenium, Se

X

X

-

X

X

X

Cobalt

 

 

 

 

X

X

Iodine/Iodide

-

 

-

 

 

-

Chromium

-

 

-

X

X

X

Molybdenum

-

 

-

X

 

X

Sulphur

X

 

-

X

 

X

Chloride

-

 

-

 

 

X is salt added

VITAMINS

 

 

-

 

 

 

Vitamin C

-

-

-

X

-

X

Vitamin B1/Thiamin

X

X

-

X

X

X

Vitamin B2/Riboflavin

X

X

-

X

X

X

Vitamin B3/Niacin

X

X

-

X

X

X

Vitamin B5/Pantothenic acid

X

X

-

X

X

X

Vitamin B-6/Pyridoxine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Vitamin B7/Biotin

-

 

 

 

X

X

Vitamin B9/Folate, Folic acid

X

X

-

X

X

X

Vitamin B-12 /Cobalamins

X

-

-

-

-

X

Vitamin A/ Retinol

X

-

-

-

X

X

Carotene, beta

-

-

-

-

X

X

Carotene, alpha

-

-

-

trace

-

X

Cryptoxanthin, beta

X

-

-

-

 

X

Lutein + zeaxanthin

X

-

-

-

X

X

Vitamin E/Tocopherol

X

-

X

trace

X

X

Vitamin D, D2 + D3 /Calciferol

X

-

-

-

-

X

Vitamin K /phylloquinone

X

-

X

X

X

X

FATTY ACIDS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fatty acids, total saturated

X

-

X

X

X

X

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated

X

-

X

X

X

X

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated

X

-

X

X

X

X

Bottom of Form

AMINO ACIDS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tryptophan

X

X

-

X

X

X

Choline, total

X

-

X

X

X

X

Threonine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Isoleucine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Leucine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Lysine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Methionine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Cystine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Phenylalanine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Tyrosine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Valine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Arginine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Histidine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Alanine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Aspartic acid

X

X

-

X

X

X

Glutamic acid

X

X

-

X

X

X

Glycine

X

X

-

X

X

X

Proline

X

X

-

X

X

X

Serine

X

X

-

X

X

X

By adding salted butter you provide the chloride and more sodium, as well as boosting the Vitamin A levels considerably.  It also boosts the energy levels, which if one is a hiker, is quite handy.  If the salt used in the butter is sea salt you will then get the Iodide that is missing.

Not an advertisement, just a photo to show that butter with sea salt already exists

 

Method

 

There is not one recipe for fruit malt loaf that is the principle one, so we have provided some alternatives, along with a rather unusual 'added extra'.

 

 

 

BBC goodfood recipe

sunflower oil, for greasing

150ml hot black tea

175g malt extract, plus extra for glazing

85g dark muscovado sugar

300g mixed dried fruits

2 large eggs, beaten

250g plain flour

1 tsp baking powder

½ tsp bicarbonate of soda

 

Heat oven to 150C/130C fan/gas 2. Line the base and ends of two greased 450g/1lb non-stick loaf tins with strips of baking parchment.

Pour the hot tea into a mixing bowl with the malt, sugar and dried fruit. Stir well, then add the eggs.

Tip in the flour, then quickly stir in the baking powder and bicarbonate of soda and pour into the prepared tins. Bake for 50 mins until firm and well risen. While still warm, brush with a little more malt to glaze and leave to cool.

Remove from the tins. If you can bear not to eat it straight away, it gets more sticky after wrapping and keeping for 2-5 days. Serve sliced and buttered, if you like.

 

 The 'perfect' malt loaf

11 tbsp malt extract, plus a little extra to glaze
50g soft brown sugar
150ml strong tea
200g dried prunes or other dried fruit
125g plain white organic flour
125g organic wholemeal flour
3 tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt

Stir together the malt extract, sugar and tea, then add the dried fruit. Leave to soak for 15 minutes.
Line a 10x20cm loaf tin with paper and heat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark four.
Whisk together the flours, baking powder and salt, then stir into the mixture to make a soft batter.
Spoon into the tin and bake for about an hour, until a skewer comes out cleanish (the top will bow, don't worry!).
Paint the top with malt extract and leave to cool in the tin. Wrap in baking paper once cool, and put in an airtight container for two to three days before eating.

 

 

 There are variations on the recipe above that use treacle where some of the malt extract is partially replaced by a few spoons of treacle.  This tends to make it a lot darker and stickier.

Shown left -  malt loaf pudding [buttered malt loaf soaked in a milk and egg mixture, and then baked in the oven] with athol brose ice cream [see oats]

 

 

 

 

Malt loaf ice cream

3 oz stale malt loaf

3oz golden sugar

4 egg yolks

½ pt single cream

2 tbs sherry

½ pt double cream

Crisp up the stale malt loaf a little in the oven, then crumble to produce crumbs.

Beat the egg yolks with the sugar until thick and pale yellow.

Heat the single cream and when nearly boiling, pour onto the egg mixture – still beating [a portable electric  whisk helps here]

Leave to cool.

Stir in the sherry, then add the malt loaf crumbs.

Lightly whip the double cream.

Fold the whipped cream into the egg mixture.

Place in ice cream maker if you have one.  Otherwise, freeze until the mixture begins to set , then fork through to ensure crumbs are well distributed, return to freezer.

Remove from refrigerator one hour before serving

 This recipe is also good with madeira or marsala instead of the sherry. 

It is very good with rum, but in this case it works better if the malt loaf is soaked in the rum [a little more rum may be needed] There is no need to put it into the oven, the soaking will produce breadcrumbs. 

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