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Protective effect of curcumin against heavy metals-induced liver damage

Identifier

017774

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A description of the experience

Food Chem Toxicol. 2014 Jul;69:182-201. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2014.04.016. Epub 2014 Apr 18.

Protective effect of curcumin against heavy metals-induced liver damage.

García-Niño WR1, Pedraza-Chaverrí J2.

  • 1Department of Biology, Faculty of Chemistry, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), University City, 04510 D.F., Mexico.
  • 2Department of Biology, Faculty of Chemistry, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), University City, 04510 D.F., Mexico. Electronic address: pedraza@unam.mx.

Abstract

Occupational or environmental exposures to heavy metals produce several adverse health effects. The common mechanism determining their toxicity and carcinogenicity is the generation of oxidative stress that leads to hepatic damage.

In addition, oxidative stress induced by metal exposure leads to the activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2/Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1/antioxidant response elements (Nrf2/Keap1/ARE) pathway.

Since antioxidant and chelating agents are generally used for the treatment of heavy metals poisoning, this review is focused on the protective role of curcumin against liver injury induced by heavy metals. Curcumin has shown, in clinical and preclinical studies, numerous biological activities including therapeutic efficacy against various human diseases and anti-hepatotoxic effects against environmental or occupational toxins. Curcumin reduces the hepatotoxicity induced by

  • arsenic,
  • cadmium,
  • chromium,
  • copper,
  • lead and
  • mercury,

prevents histological injury, lipid peroxidation and glutathione (GSH) depletion, maintains the liver antioxidant enzyme status and protects against mitochondrial dysfunction. The preventive effect of curcumin on the noxious effects induced by heavy metals has been attributed to its scavenging and chelating properties, and/or to the ability to induce the Nrf2/Keap1/ARE pathway. However, additional research is needed in order to propose curcumin as a potential protective agent against liver damage induced by heavy metals.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Curcumin; Heavy metals; Hepatoprotective; Mitochondrial dysfunction; Nrf2; Oxidative stress

PMID:

24751969

The source of the experience

PubMed

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