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Lincoln, Abraham - The President and the Emancipation Act

Identifier

004659

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

Words are used here in the experience and words are only used when the communicator is bodied or recently disembodied.  Here I think a bodied knowledgeable out of body helper possessed Nellie to ensure the president did the right thing - one of the Brotherhood maybe ?

The Emancipation Proclamation was an executive order issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, as a war measure during the American Civil War,  to all segments of the Executive branch (including the Army and Navy) of the United States. It proclaimed the freedom of slaves in the ten states that were still in rebellion, thus applying to 3.1 million of the 4 million slaves in the U.S. at the time. The Proclamation was based on the president's constitutional authority as commander in chief of the armed forces; it was not a law passed by Congress. The Proclamation also ordered that "suitable" persons among those freed could be enrolled into the paid service of United States' forces, and ordered the Union Army (and all segments of the Executive branch) to "recognize and maintain the freedom of" the ex-slaves. The Proclamation did not compensate the owners, did not itself outlaw slavery, and did not make the ex-slaves (called freedmen) citizens. It made the eradication of slavery an explicit war goal, in addition to the goal of reuniting the Union.

A description of the experience

Ruth Montgomery – A Gift of Prophecy

Mr. Lincoln entered the Red Room after the others had assembled, and on being introduced said kindly: "So this is our little Nettie, is it, that we have heard so much about?"

Miss Colburn then went into trance, and another voice reportedly talked through her for more than an hour, tracing the history of the nation and winding up with an impassioned plea for the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation. A witness recorded:

"The President was charged, with the utmost solemnity and force of manner, not to abate the terms of its issue, and not to delay its enforcement as a law beyond the opening of the year; and he was assured that it was to be the crowning event of his Administration and his life; and that while he was being counselled by strong parties to defer the enforcement of it, hoping to supplant it by other measures and to delay action, he must in no wise heed such counsel, but stand firm to his convictions and fearlessly perform and work and fulfill the mission for which he had been raised up by an overruling Providence."

Those present spoke of "the majesty of the utterance, the strength and force of the language, and the importance; and seemed to realize that some strong masculine spirit-force was giving speech to almost Divine commands."

While standing in front of the President, Miss Colburn regained consciousness and stepped back in confusion, not remembering where she was. The President, with folded arms, was regarding her intently. A gentleman present asked in a low tone: "Mr. President, did you notice anything peculiar in the method of address?"

Lincoln raised his body as if shaking off a spell, glanced significantly at a full-length portrait of Daniel Webster hanging above the piano, and replied: "Yes, and it is very singular; very."

Somes asked whether any pressure had indeed been brought to bear on the President to defer enforcement of the Emancipation Proclamation, and Lincoln replied:
"Under these circumstances that question is perfectly proper, as we are all friends. It is taking all my nerve and strength to withstand such pressure."

While the men continued talking, Lincoln laid his hand on Nettie's saying: "My child, you possess a very singular gift; that it is of God, I have no doubt. I thank you for coming here tonight. It is more important than perhaps anyone present can understand."

On January 1st, 1863, President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation.

The source of the experience

Lincoln, Abraham

Concepts, symbols and science items

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Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Overloads

Grief

Suppressions

Inherited genes

Commonsteps

References