Observations placeholder

Heavy metal stress in alders: Tolerance and vulnerability of the actinorhizal symbiosis.

Identifier

021021

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

A description of the experience

Chemosphere. 2015 Nov;138:300-8. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.06.005. Epub 2015 Jun 16.    Heavy metal stress in alders: Tolerance and vulnerability of the actinorhizal symbiosis.

Bélanger PA1, Bellenger JP2, Roy S3.

1Centre d'étude et de valorisation de la diversité microbienne, Département de Biologie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Qc J1K 2R1, Canada.

2Centre d'étude et de valorisation de la diversité microbienne, Département de Chimie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Qc J1K 2R1, Canada; Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA.

3Centre d'étude et de valorisation de la diversité microbienne, Département de Biologie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Qc J1K 2R1, Canada. Electronic address: Sebastien.Roy@USherbrooke.ca.

Abstract

Alders have already demonstrated their potential for the revegetation of both mining and industrial sites. These actinorhizal trees and shrubs and the actinobacteria Frankia associate in a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis which could however be negatively affected by the presence of heavy metals, and accumulate them. In our hydroponic assay with black alders, quantification of the roots and shoots metal concentrations showed that, in the absence of stress, symbiosis increases Mo and Ni root content and simultaneously decreases Mo shoot content. Interestingly, the Mo shoot content also decreases in the presence of Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd for symbiotic alders. In symbiotic alders, Pb shoot translocation was promoted in presence of Pb. On the other hand, Cd exclusion in symbiotic root tissues was observed with Pb and Cd. In the presence of symbiosis, only Cd and Pb showed translocation into aerial tissues when present in the nutrient solution. Moreover, the translocation of Ni to shoot was prevented by symbiosis in the presence of Cd, Ni and Pb. The hydroponic experiment demonstrated that alders benefit from the symbiosis, producing more biomass (total, root and shoot) than non nodulated alders in control condition, and in the presence of metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd). Heavy metals did not reduce the nodule numbers (SNN), but the presence of Zn or Cd did reduce nodule allocation. Our study suggests that the Frankia-alder symbiosis is a promising (and a compatible) plant-microorganism association for the revegetation of contaminated sites, with minimal risk of metal dispersion.

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Actinorhizal; Alnus glutinosa; Frankia; Heavy metal; Phytoremediation; Symbiosis

PMID: 26091871

The source of the experience

PubMed

Concepts, symbols and science items

Concepts

Symbols

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Commonsteps

References