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Dalton, John – Philosophical Experiments – 06 Crystals and the Laws of Attraction

Identifier

025349

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

A description of the experience

John Dalton – Philosophical Experiments

CHEMISTRY

91. Crystallization is another beautiful effect which frequently attends chemical action. Everybody is familiar with the appearance of crystals, and the different forms they exhibit. Thus we have crystals of sugar, in the form of sugarcandy, and crystals of Epsom salts, which are as well known for their different appearance, as for their disagreeable qualities. Both these kind of crystals are as different in form as they are in taste; and many others may be easily called to recollection : yet all these particular forms are occasioned by one simple law of nature, which is another kind of affinity, and causes the particles of various liquids, in cooling, to adhere together, and assume a crystalline shape.

In the great operations of nature, crystallization takes place on a grand scale. The Giant's Causeway, in Ireland, and Fingal's Cave, in Scotland, might be mentioned as illustrations; and the crystallization of water, in the form of ice, everyone is familiar with. The student may easily imitate some of the phenomena, and, in doing so, will observe how beautifully one general law operates alike on the smallest particles, as well as on masses of immense magnitude. It is merely necessary, in order to procure good crystals, that the liquid should be set on one side to cool gradually, in some place free from dust ; and the process may be quickened by dropping a crystal or two into the liquid.

From the examples that are given, some knowledge of the variety of forms crystals assume may be derived.

The source of the experience

Dalton, John

Concepts, symbols and science items

Symbols

Crystal

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Commonsteps

References