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Celery as an anti-dote to the infertility caused by toxin DEHP

Identifier

012445

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

DEHP is widely used as a plasticizer in manufacturing of articles made of PVC.  Plastics may contain 1% to 40% of DEHP. It is also used as a hydraulic fluid and as a dielectric fluid in capacitors. DEHP also finds use as a solvent in glowsticks.  DEHP has a low vapor pressure, but the temperatures for processing PVC articles are often high, leading to release of elevated levels, raising concerns about health risks.

It can be absorbed from food and water. Higher levels have been found in milk and cheese. It can also leach into a liquid that comes in contact with the plastic; it extracts faster into nonpolar solvents (e.g. oils and fats in foods packed in PVC). Food and Drug Administration (FDA) therefore permits use of DEHP-containing packaging only for foods that primarily contain water. The US EPA limits for DEHP in drinking water is 6 ppb. DEHP levels in some European samples of milk, were found at 2000 times higher than the EPA Safe Drinking Water limits (12,000 ppb). Levels of DEHP in some European cheeses and creams were even higher, up to 200,000 ppb. The U.S. agency OSHA's limit for occupational exposure is 5 mg/m3 of air.

DEHP has been used as a plasticiser in medical devices such as intravenous tubing and bags, catheters, nasogastric tubes, dialysis bags and tubing, and blood bags and transfusion tubing, and air tubes. For this reason, concern has been expressed about leachates transported into the patient, especially for those requiring extensive infusions, e.g. newborns in intensive care nursery settings, hemophiliacs, and kidney dialysis patients. According to the European Commission Scientific Committee on Health and Environmental Risks (SCHER), exposure to DEHP may exceed the tolerable daily intake in some specific population groups, namely people exposed through medical procedures such as kidney dialysis

A description of the experience

Reprod Biol. 2014 Sep;14(3):182-9. doi: 10.1016/j.repbio.2014.04.002. Epub 2014 Apr 21.

Celery oil modulates DEHP-induced reproductive toxicity in male rats.

Helal MA.  Department of Zoology, Faculty of Women for Arts, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. Electronic address: monaamhelal@yahoo.com.

The objective of the study was to investigate the protective effect of Apium graveolens (AP) against di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP)-induced testes injury in rats. Adult rats were divided into nine groups:

(1) control group (no treatment);
(2) corn oil (60μg/kg body weight - bwt);
(3) AP (50μg/kg bwt);
(4) 300mg DEHP/kg bwt;
(5) 500mg DEHP/kg bwt;
(6) 1000mg DEHP/kg bwt;
(7) 300mg DEHP/kg bwt+AP;
(8) 500mg DEHP/kg bwt+AP; and
(9) 1000mg DEHP/kg bwt+AP.

Oral administration of treatments was performed daily for 6 weeks. DEHP decreased (p<0.01) body weight, testis weight and serum concentrations of testosterone, cholesterol and total proteins. Moreover, DEHP increased (p<0.001) total antioxidant capacity in the testis and plasma DEHP level. In addition, DEHP decreased mRNA expression of two testicular steroidogenic enzymes: 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. DEHP also caused atrophy, vacuolar degeneration and aspermia of the seminiferous tubules.

AP administered concurrently with DEHP effectively alleviated most of the DEHP-induced effects. In conclusion, in male rats, DEHP had adverse effects on the testis including inhibition of androgen production. A concurrent administration of A. graveolens (celery oil) protected the testis against DEHP-induced toxicity.

Copyright © 2014 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:  17β-HSD; 3β-HSD; Cholesterol; Testes; Testosterone

PMID: 25152515

The source of the experience

PubMed

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References