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Tom Tom the Piper's son

Identifier

008200

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

He probably knew Old King Cole.

A good rendering of the song here - LINK

It is worth mentioning that two alternative symbolic meanings can be deduced here -  the pig as the means of transport but also the pig as a type of pie!  The pigs mentioned in the rhyme might have been [according to one source] "a sweet pastry-type cake which were commonly sold by street vendors in the eighteenth century. They were made from some sort of dough and had currants for eyes".

But my guess is the rhyme is a lot older than this and the pig as the means of transport is a more likely symbolic meaning.

A description of the experience

Tom Tom the Pipers Son

Tom Tom the piper's son
Stole a pig and away he ran,
And all the tune that he could play
Was over the hills and far away

Over the hills and a great way off
The wind shall blow my top knot off
And all the tune that he could play
Was over the hills and far away

Tom with his pipe made such a noise
That he pleased both the girls and boys
And they would stop to hear him play
Over the hills and far away

Tom with his pipe did play with such skill
That those who heard him could never keep still;
As soon as he played they began for to dance,
Even pigs on their hind legs would after him prance.

As Dolly was milking her cow one day,
Tom took his pipe and began for to play;
So Doll and the cow danced 'The Cheshire Round',
Till the pail was broken and the milk ran on the ground.

The source of the experience

Nursery rhymes

Concepts, symbols and science items

Concepts

Songlines

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

References