Observations placeholder

Hans Peter Duerr - On Ragnarok and Vargold

Identifier

017122

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

Both the Norse peoples and it seems Nicholas Roerich believe in Armageddon or Judgement Day.

The wolf also has extremely special significance in Norse myth.

The wolves Geri and Freki, for example,  were the Norse god Odin's faithful pets who were reputed to be "of good omen."

But, Norse mythology describes three malevolent wolves - the giant Fenrir, who was feared and hated by the Æsir, and Fenrisulfr's children, Skoll and Hati.

So we have here the interesting notion of ambivalence in the perception of a wolf in Norse society  – these animals are revered and feared

Fenrir is bound by the gods, but is ultimately destined to grow too large for his bonds and devour Odin during the course of Ragnarök. At that time, he will have grown so large that his upper jaw touches the sky while his lower touches the earth when he gapes. He will be slain by Odin's son, Viðarr.  Fenrir's two offspring will according to legend, devour the sun and moon at Ragnarök.

Ragnarök is thus the  "final destiny of the gods" which a great battle foretold to ultimately result in the death of gods Odin, Thor, Freyr, Heimdall, and the jötunn Loki, the occurrence of various natural disasters, and the subsequent submersion of the world in water. Afterward, the world resurfaces anew and fertile, the surviving gods meet, and the world is repopulated by two human survivors.

A description of the experience

Hans Peter Duerr - Dreamtime

The end of time before ragnarok, the twilight of the gods when all order ceased and things were turned upside down was called vargold ‘wolf’s time’ by the Voluspa

The source of the experience

Norse

Concepts, symbols and science items

Symbols

Wolf

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Commonsteps

References