Some science behind the scenes

PVDF

Polyvinylidene Fluoride, or PVDF is a highly non-reactive and pure thermoplastic fluoropolymer – a special plastic material in the fluoropolymer family.  It can be injected, molded or welded and is commonly used in the chemical, semiconductor, medical and defense industries, as well as in lithium ion batteries.

It is generally used in applications requiring strength and resistance to solvents, acids, bases and heat, and low smoke generation during a fire. It has a low cost compared to the other fluoropolymers. It is available as:

  • Paint - A fine powder grade  is used as the principal ingredient of high-end paints for metals.  These PVDF paints have extremely good gloss and color retention, and they are in use on many prominent buildings around the world, e.g. the Petronas Towers in Malaysia and Taipei 101 in Taiwan, as well as on commercial and residential metal roofing.
  • piping and tubing
  • line - PVDF is used for speciality monofilament fishing lines, sold as fluorocarbon replacements for nylon monofilament. Optical density is lower than nylon, which makes the line less discernible. The surface is harder, so it is more resistant to abrasion and sharp fish teeth. It is also denser than nylon, making it sink faster
  • sheet , films and plates
  • a crosslinked closed cell foam -  used increasingly in aviation and aerospace applications
  • an insulator for wire - PVDF is commonly used as insulation on some kinds of electrical wires, because of its combination of flexibility, low weight, low thermal conductivity, high chemical corrosion resistance, and heat resistance. Most of the narrow 30-gauge wire used in wire wrap circuit assembly and printed circuit board rework is PVDF-insulated.

And PVDF is a spiritual transducer, more specifically a piezoelectric transducer able to convert mechanical stimulation to electrical stimulation and vice versa.