Some science behind the scenes

Body and its functions

There are actually hundreds upon hundreds of functions of the body.  Functions are allocated to various ‘things’ in the body.  Thus a cell has functions of its own, then when a cell is grouped into an organ such as the liver or the stomach the stomach and liver then have their own functions – see Aggregation

At each level of aggregation new functions emerge, so the body is actually a very complex multi-function system with functions operating at all sort of levels of Aggregation.  If we take an example at a high level:

  • The stomach – has a ‘digestive system’
  • The heart, arteries and veins – have a ‘circulation system’
  • The sexual organs – have a ‘reproductive system’
  • The Intestines – have an ‘excretory system’
  • The liver – has a system which has a lot of functions - including detoxification, protein synthesis, and production of the input needed necessary for digestion

Remember that I am describing ‘software’ here not mechanical, electrical  or chemical processes – this is a functional action and interaction.

For more details about the principles of Aggregation – see Aggregation.

We need to realise that every aggregate – liver, cell, heart – etc is a self-contained functional unit.  Given sufficient nutrients it can survive by itself.  Our hearts can survive without us and can be transplanted, so can our kidneys, our lungs, and numerous other bits and pieces.  The cells in those organs have to adjust to a new identifier – to belonging to a new body and a new ID, but there are thousands upon thousands of autonomic functions that are not related to ‘us’ as a whole human being to our body and our Higher Spirit. 

The lungs for example clearly have their own functions.  A newborn child, will gasp, take a small puff followed almost instantly by a new and larger intake of air.  The pump is primed, automatic processes take over, the body draws the third of six or seven hundred million breaths that constitute a lifetime.  It is automatic - subconscious.

The heart can beat without us, the kidneys can process without us.  They can even be put in a different part of someone else’s body and they will still function. A new kidney, for example,  usually begins functioning immediately. Living donor kidneys normally require 3–5 days to reach normal functioning levels .  In most cases of kidney transplant, the barely functioning existing kidneys are not removed, as this has been shown to increase the rates of surgical morbidities.