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Vaccines, and yeast allergy and intolerance

Identifier

012290

Type of Spiritual Experience

None

Background

We have to take the information provided in this paper not as it stands, but what it implies, which may not be very scientific but is a great deal more useful.

Vaccines can contain yeast and one of those vaccines is the hepatitis B vaccine.

Allergy to yeast is known to cause asthma and breathing difficulties in some children. Severe asthma attacks can and do lead to death.

And as we can see Lauren DiMiceli and associates agreed. They carried out this study using the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System database as a tool. They reported that some children had reacted adversely to the yeast used in vaccinations. The problems they found were mostly linked to the Hep B vaccine.

But where did the yeast allergy come from?  And the answer appears to be both the hep B vaccine and the Hib vaccine.

Babies are given the Hib vaccine.

Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine (Hib janan or PRP vaccine) is a 'conjugate vaccine developed for the prevention of invasive disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteria'. It is routinely given in the USA

A description of the experience

Vaccine. 2006 Feb 6;24(6):703-7. Epub 2005 Aug 9.  Vaccination of yeast sensitive individuals: review of safety data in the US vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS).  DiMiceli L1, Pool V, Kelso JM, Shadomy SV, Iskander J; V.A.E.R.S. Team.  1Immunization Safety Branch, NIP/CDC, Mail Stop E61, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. bqw6@cdc.gov

The preparation of recombinant hepatitis B vaccines involves using cellular cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, otherwise known as baker's yeast.

Prior to vaccine licensure, clinical trials were performed to address whether residual yeast proteins in the vaccines could induce anaphylaxis, including testing for IgE anti-yeast antibody levels. 1-2% of subjects had anti-yeast IgE antibodies before immunization, but demonstrated no significant rise in IgE after HBV.

We searched reports in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) for those that mentioned a history of allergy to yeast and then reviewed the adverse events described in these reports for potential anaphylactic reactions.

Probable anaphylaxis was defined as the presence of one or more dermatologic symptoms and one or more respiratory, gastrointestinal, or cardiovascular symptoms with onset within 4 h of Hepatitis B vaccination. Possible anaphylaxis was defined in one of two ways:
(1) cases that described dermatologic or respiratory symptoms (but not both) occurring within 4h of vaccination; or
(2) cases that described one or more dermatologic and/or respiratory symptoms occurring 4-12 h post vaccination.

Among the 107 reports of pre-existing "yeast allergies," 11 reports described probable or possible anaphylaxis after HBV.

Four additional cases were described after other vaccines.

The majority of vaccinees who met the case definitions and had a history of yeast allergies were female, ages ranged from 10 to 64, and symptom onset ranged from 15 min to 5 h after vaccination. No deaths were reported.

The small number of reports to VAERS may be partly due to health care professionals observing current contraindications by not vaccinating yeast sensitive individuals.

PMID:  16154669

The source of the experience

PubMed

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References