Observations placeholder

Neuroprotective effects of the cultivated Chondrus crispus in a C. elegans model of Parkinson's disease.

Identifier

016973

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

Chondrus crispus — commonly called Irish moss or carrageen moss (Irish carraigín, "little rock") — is a species of red algae which grows abundantly along the rocky parts of the Atlantic coast of Europe and North America. In its fresh condition this protist is soft and cartilaginous, varying in color from a greenish-yellow, through red, to a dark purple or purplish-brown. The principal constituent is a mucilaginous body, made of the polysaccharide carrageenan, which constitutes 55% of its weight. The organism also consists of nearly 10% protein and about 15% mineral matter, and is rich in iodine and sulfur. When softened in water it has a sea-like odour and because of the abundant cell wall polysaccharides it will form a jelly when boiled, containing from 20 to 100 times its weight of water.

A description of the experience

Mar Drugs. 2015 Apr 14;13(4):2250-66. doi: 10.3390/md13042250.  Neuroprotective effects of the cultivated Chondrus crispus in a C. elegans model of Parkinson's disease.  Liu J1, Banskota AH2, Critchley AT3, Hafting J4, Prithiviraj B5.

Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in the elderly people, currently with no cure. Its mechanisms are not well understood, thus studies targeting cause-directed therapy or prevention are needed. This study uses the transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans PD model.

We demonstrated that dietary supplementation of the worms with an extract from the cultivated red seaweed Chondrus crispus decreased the accumulation of α-synulein and protected the worms from the neuronal toxin-, 6-OHDA, induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration. These effects were associated with a corrected slowness of movement.

We also showed that the enhancement of oxidative stress tolerance and an up-regulation of the stress response genes, sod-3 and skn-1, may have served as the molecular mechanism for the C. crispus-extract-mediated protection against PD pathology. Altogether, apart from its potential as a functional food, the tested red seaweed, C. crispus, might find promising  applications for the development of potential novel [treatments] for humans.

The source of the experience

PubMed

Concepts, symbols and science items

Concepts

Symbols

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Overloads

Iodide imbalance

Suppressions

Iodide
Parkinsons disease
Seaweed
Sulphur

Commonsteps

References