Observations placeholder

Hume, David - on empathy

Identifier

029320

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

Hume calls it sympathy, but these days we tend to call it empathy

A description of the experience

Treatise of Human Nature/Book 2: Of the passions by David Hume
PART I: Of pride and humility
Section 11: Of the love of fame
 

No quality of human nature is more remarkable, both in itself and in its consequences, than that propensity we have to sympathize with others, and to receive by communication their inclinations and sentiments, however different from, or even contrary to our own. This is not only conspicuous in children, who implicitly embrace every opinion propos'd to them; but also in men of the greatest judgment and understanding, who find it very difficult to follow their own reason or inclination, in opposition to that of their friends and daily companions.

To this principle we ought to ascribe the great uniformity we may observe in the humours and turn of thinking of those of the same nation; and 'tis much more probable, that this resemblance arises from sympathy, than from any influence of the soil and climate which tho' they continue invariably the same, are not able to preserve the character of a nation the same for a century together.

A good-natur'd man finds himself in an instant of the same humour with his company; and even the proudest and most surly take a tincture from their countrymen and acquaintance.

A chearful countenance infuses a sensible complacency and serenity into my mind; as an angry or sorrowful one throws a sudden damp upon me. Hatred, resentment, esteem, love, courage, mirth and melancholy; all these passions I feel more from communication than from my own natural temper and disposition.

So remarkable a phænomenon merits our attention, and must be trac'd up to its first principles. When any affection is infus'd by sympathy, it is at first known only by its effects, and by those external signs in the countenance and conversation, which convey an idea of it. This idea is presently converted into an impression, and acquires such a degree of force and vivacity, as to become the very passion itself, and produce an equal emotion, as any original affection. However instantaneous this change of the idea into an impression may be, it proceeds from certain views and reflections, which will not escape the strict scrutiny of a philosopher, tho' they may the person himself, who makes them.

The source of the experience

Hume, David

Concepts, symbols and science items

Concepts

Emotion
Emotions

Symbols

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Suppressions

Home schooling
Squash the big I am

Commonsteps

Empathy

References