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A migraine variant with abdominal colic and Alice in Wonderland syndrome: a case report and review

Identifier

026178

Type of Spiritual Experience

Hallucination

Number of hallucinations: 1

Background

A description of the experience

BMC Neurol. 2010 Jan 6;10:2. doi: 10.1186/1471-2377-10-2.

A migraine variant with abdominal colic and Alice in Wonderland syndrome: a case report and review.

Hamed SA1.

Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Assiut University Hospital, Assiut, Egypt. hamed_sherifa@yahoo.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Abdominal migraine is a commonly described migraine variant in children and young adults, but associations with Alice in Wonderland syndrome and lilliputian hallucinations are exceptional.

CASE PRESENTATION:

A 20 years-old male experienced frequent and prolonged attacks of abdominal colic associated with autonomic manifestations started at the age of ten. At the age of 17, he additionally described prolonged attacks (>or= 7 days) of distortions of shape, size or position of objects or subjects. He said

"Quite suddenly, objects appear small and distant (teliopsia) or large and close (peliopsia). I feel as I am getting shorter and smaller "shrinking" and also the size of persons are not longer than my index finger (a lilliputian proportion). Sometimes I see the blind in the window or the television getting up and down, or my leg or arm is swinging. I may hear the voices of people quite loud and close or faint and far. Occasionally, I experience attacks of migrainous headache associated with eye redness, flashes of lights and a feeling of giddiness. I am always conscious to the intangible changes in myself and my environment".

There is a strong family history of common migraine. Clinical examination, brain-MRI and EEG were normal. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and evoked potentials revealed enhanced cortical excitability in multiple brain regions.

CONCLUSIONS:

The association between the two migraine variants (abdominal migraine and Alice in Wonderland Syndrome) might have clinical, pathophysiological and management implications. I think this is the first description in the literature.

PMID: 20053267

The source of the experience

PubMed

Concepts, symbols and science items

Symbols

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Overloads

Colic
Migraine

Commonsteps

References