Observations placeholder

Wim Hof - The Ice Man

Identifier

027518

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

A description of the experience

Wikipedia

Wim Hof (born 20 April 1959), also known as the Iceman, is a Dutch extreme athlete noted for his ability to withstand extreme cold, which he attributes to his Wim Hof Method (WHM) breathing techniques.[1][2][3][4] Hof says that the WHM can treat or help alleviate symptoms of illnesses such as multiple sclerosis, arthritis, diabetes, clinical depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and cancer.[1]

Hof has set out to spread the potential health benefits of his breathing techniques, working with scientists around the world to prove that his techniques work.[5] A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America stated that by consciously hyperventilating, Hof can increase his heart rate, adrenaline levels, and blood alkalinity.[6] Hof is the subject of The New York Times bestselling book What Doesn't Kill Us, which tells the story of how the investigative journalist Scott Carney took an assignment to debunk the WHM but ended up learning Hof's techniques......................

Inside the Superhuman World of the Iceman

 

Records

Hof holds 26 world records, including one for longest ice bath.[9] In 2007 he climbed to 6,700 metres (22,000 ft) altitude at Mount Everest wearing nothing but shorts and shoes, but failed to reach the summit due to a recurring foot injury.[10][11] In 2008 he broke his previous world record by staying immersed in ice for 1 hour, 13 minutes and 48 seconds at Guinness World Records 2008.[citation needed] The night before, he performed the feat on the Today Show.[citation needed]

In February 2009 Hof reached the top of Mount Kilimanjaro within two days wearing only shorts.[12] Hof completed a half marathon above the arctic circle in Finland, in temperatures close to −20 °C (−4 °F). Dressed in nothing but shorts, Hof finished in 5 hours and 25 minutes. The challenge was filmed by Firecrackerfilms, who make productions for BBC, Channel 4 and National Geographic.[13]

In 2011 Hof again broke the ice endurance record by standing fully immersed in ice for 1 hour and 44 minutes in Tokyo, Japan.[14]

In 2011 Hof broke the ice endurance record twice, in Inzell in February and in New York City in November, setting a new Guinness World Record of 1 hour, 52 minutes, and 42 seconds.[15] In September, Hof ran a full marathon in the Namib Desert without water, under the supervision of Dr. Thijs Eijsvogels.[16]

TEDxAmsterdam - Wim Hof - 11/30/10

 

The source of the experience

Athlete

Concepts, symbols and science items

Symbols

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Suppressions

Controlled breathing

References

  • Rolling Stone, Wim Hof Says He Holds the Key to a Healthy Life – But Will Anyone Listen? Erik Hedegaard, November 16, 2017
  • Joseph Angier, 7 March 2008, ABC News, Iceman on Everest: 'It Was Easy', Accessed 14 April 2014
  • FEHILY, TOBY (7 October 2017). "What Doesn't Kill Us, To Be a Machine: books on extreme measures". Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  • Kox M, van Eijk LT, Zwaag J, van den Wildenberg J, GJ Sweep FC, van der Hoeven JG, Pickkers P (May 20, 2014). "Voluntary activation of the sympathetic nervous system and attenuation of the innate immune response in humans". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 111 (20): 7379–7384. doi:10.1073/pnas.1322174111. PMC 4034215  . PMID 24799686. Retrieved January 28, 2017.