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Observations placeholder

Fort, Charles - The Book of the Damned - Falls of 'rancid butter'

Identifier

011876

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

A description of the experience

The Book of the Damned - Charles Fort

In Philosophical Transactions, 19-224,
is an extract from a letter by Mr. Robert Vans, of Kilkenny, Ireland, dated Nov. 15, 1695: that there had been "of late," in the counties of Limerick and Tipperary, showers of a sort of matter like butter or grease... having "a very stinking smell."…….. In Mr. Vans' letter, it is said that the "butter" was supposed to have medicinal properties, and "was gathered in pots and other vessels by some of the inhabitants of this place."

There follows an extract from a letter by the Bishop of Cloyne, upon "a very odd phenomenon," which was observed in Munster and Leinster: that for a good part of the spring of 1695 there fell a substance which the country people called "butter"--"soft, clammy, and of a dark yellow"--that cattle fed "indifferently" in fields where this substance lay. 
"It fell in lumps as big as the end of one's finger." It had a "strong ill scent." His Grace calls it a "stinking dew."

In all the following volumes of Philosophical Transactions there is no speculation upon this extraordinary subject. Ostracism. The fate of this datum is a good instance of damnation, not by denial, and not by explaining away, but by simple disregard.

Amer. Jour. Sci., 1-28-361,
that, April 11, 1832--  --fell a substance that was wine-yellow, transparent, soft, and smelling like rancid oil. M. Herman, a chemist who examined it, named it "sky oil." For analysis and chemic reactions, see the_Journal.

The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 13-368,
mentions an "unctuous" substance that fell near Rotterdam, in 1832.  

In Comptes Rendus, 13-215,
there is an account of an oily, reddish matter that fell at Genoa, February, 1841.

The source of the experience

Fort, Charles

Concepts, symbols and science items

Symbols

Activities and commonsteps

Commonsteps

References