Observations placeholder

Croll, Oswald - Preface of Signatures – 13

Identifier

016031

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

photo by Katerina Plotnikova

A description of the experience

Croll, Oswald - Preface of Signatures – 13

Paracelsus, the searcher of secrets, in his writings, earnestly persuades the true physician, that is desirous to be instructed, both in the science and use of medicine, to be well acquainted with the signatures and hieroglyphic characters of things; and among other excellent services done to the republic of medicine, he declares, that there are three ways, by which Nature pretermitting no notable thing, manifests man, and all created things.

  • First by Chiromancy, which is the natural astrum of things, and comprehends the external parts of man, as hands, feet, lines, veins.
  • Secondly by physiognomy, which compriseth the face and head.
  • Thirdly by habit and proportion, manners, and use of the whole body, denoting the senses of the mind and cogitations of the heart.

After him John Baptista Porta of Naples, a famous phyropta, and most prudent emulator of Nature, in his [Greek- physiognomonia], hath set for an excellent work for public profit.

From these more perfect, I also thought it expedient to take occasion of this matter, to write of these high and accurate things. He which comes in Autumn, (to whom I hold a light) may taste the sweet cane, and eat more ripe fruits.

These few observations of mine, consigned (for it is difficult to tread in unknown paths) to the students of signatures, who with me, are not ashamed to learn, I freely would have common, which both by reading Paracelsus and Porta, and also by my own experience, I have found conveniently and analogically harmonious: for it suffices to publish what we know, till greater light be manifested.

It had been well, if that so much desired book of the most excellently learned Carrichterus, Of Plants and Signatures of Things, had been set forth to public view, wherein in a wonderful and harmonious manner, he conforms the Terrene stars of plants, to the stars of the firmament; the knowledge of which would indeed be gratefully received by the botanic public weal [good].

[Many things by most learned men might be obtained, if through false ambition they do not persuade themselves to be sufficiently learned already.]

The source of the experience

Croll, Oswald

Concepts, symbols and science items

Concepts

Humility

Symbols

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Suppressions

Squash the big I am

Commonsteps

Humility

References