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North, Stephen - The most usual configuration of a surface of action is that of a vertical plane passing through the body of the subject

Identifier

026953

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

A description of the experience

THE METAL-BENDERS by PROFESSOR JOHN B. HASTED

During 1978/9 David Robertson and I repeated the configurational experiments using five separate strain gauge specimens; Stephen North was the subject. The data bear out the original conclusions that the most usual configuration of a surface of action is that of a vertical plane passing through the body of the subject. They are summarized in Table 5.2. Since Stephen’s action takes place at rather smaller distances than that of Nicholas, the experiments were on a scale between four and five times smaller. The use of five sensors made it possible to define the plane of experimentation in more detail.

 

Table 5.2

Session

Configuration

Number of sensors

Horizontal or radial extent (cm)

Vertical extent (cm)

No. of signals

mean s

weighted mean s

EE

RV

5

26

26

14

0.69

0.90

PP

RV

4

21

13

 

GG

RH

5

26

7

19

0.41

0.49

 

LL

RH

5

30

8

 

FF

EV

6

36

15

33

0.31

0.29

 

HH1

EV

4

18

15

 



For the analysis of the new data we defined a synchronism ratio s for an event as the ratio of the number of synchronous signals to the total number of sensors exposed. The mean value of s, denoted , was calculated for a session. We also tabulate a mean value weighted according to signal magnitudes. It is clear from Table 5.2 that both and decrease in the order RV > RH > EV. The surface of action is similar to that in the first series of experiments.

Stephen behaves differently from Nicholas in sessions, in that he cannot rid himself of the idea, which seems to be a correct one in his case, that metal-bending action usually extends from his hands or arms. Normally he points one hand, or even one finger, in the direction of the sensors. When these are mounted in a radial vertical configuration, it is natural that there are synchronisms on several sensors; the ‘surface of action’ appears to be an invisible vertical extension of Stephen’s arm.

The occurrence of equidistant (E) sensor synchronisms in Stephen’s sessions was therefore of particular interest. It became apparent to me during my observation of them that possibly both hands might be involved simultaneously. As will be seen from Table 5.2, the horizontal distances between the synchronous sensors were quite small; although Stephen was asked to produce action on the entire array, he was accustomed to point his left hand at the left-hand sensor; on occasion the right hand would also point, as though he felt that this was the natural way to produce a wider action. When both right and left hands were pointed, synchronisms would sometimes occur at the sensor at which they were being pointed. Thus it is possible that more than one surface can be produced by one subject.

The source of the experience

North, Stephen

Concepts, symbols and science items

Concepts

Symbols

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Suppressions

Being a child
Biofeedback

Commonsteps

Spoon bending

References