Suppression

Strawberries

Category: Food

Type

Voluntary

Introduction and description

The correct botanical name for the strawberry is Fragaria × ananassa. Most people know the cultivated strawberry, a hybrid species that is grown worldwide, but wild strawberies also exist with a very intense flavour and much smaller fruit.

The garden strawberry was first bred in Brittany, France, in the 1750s via a cross of Fragaria virginiana from eastern North America and Fragaria chiloensis, which was brought from Chile by Amédée-François Frézier in 1714.

Cultivars of Fragaria × ananassa have replaced, in commercial production, the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca), which was the first strawberry species cultivated in the early 17th century.

The fruit is not a botanical berry, but an aggregate accessory fruit. As Wikipedia says “It is widely appreciated for its characteristic aroma, bright red color, juicy texture, and sweetness. It is consumed in large quantities, either fresh or in prepared foods such as preserves, fruit juice, pies, ice creams, milkshakes, and chocolates”.

And like practically all berries it has healing capabilities.

Background

 

One cup (236 g) of strawberries contains approximately 45 kilo-calories (188 kJ) and is an excellent source of vitamin C and flavonoids.

This fruit is very low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. It is also a good source of folate and potassium, and a very good source of dietary fiber, and manganese. One serving of about eight strawberries provides more vitamin C than an orange. The strawberry is among the top 20 fruits in antioxidant capacity.

Nutrients of strawberries

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energ

136 kJ (33 kcal)

Carbohydrates

7.68 g

- Sugars

4.89 g

- Dietary fiber

2 g

Fat

0.3 g

Protein

0.67 g

Thiamine (vit. B1)

0.024 mg (2%)

Riboflavin (vit. B2)

0.022 mg (2%)

Niacin (vit. B3)

0.386 mg (3%)

Pantothenic acid (B5)

0.125 mg (3%)

Vitamin B6

0.047 mg (4%)

Folate (vit. B9)

24 μg (6%)

Choline

5.7 mg (1%)

Vitamin C

58.8 mg (71%)

Vitamin E

0.29 mg (2%)

Vitamin K

2.2 μg (2%)

Calcium

16 mg (2%)

Iron

0.41 mg (3%)

Magnesium

13 mg (4%)

Manganese

0.386 mg (18%)

Phosphorus

24 mg (3%)

Potassium

153 mg (3%)

Sodium

1 mg (0%)

Zinc

0.14 mg (1%)

Fluoride

4.4 µg

Link to USDA Database entry
Percentages are roughly approximated
using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Method

Eat them raw with a little sugar, with cream, with home made ice cream, and mixed with other raw berries for a fruit salad.

How it works

See the observations from PubMed for their healing properties.

Advantages

Delicious
Hardy
Easily grown

Disadvantages

You have to be quick in picking them or net them - birds and slugs like them too, as [we found] do badgers.

Related observations