Suppression

Cinnamon

Category: Food

Type

Voluntary

Introduction and description

Cinnamon is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several trees from the genus Cinnamomum that is used in both sweet and savoury foods. Cinnamon trees are native to South East Asia.  Medicinally each tree does have slightly different properties, as such one does need to know the specific plant and its constituent make-up to be able to heal, but in the culinary sense the varieties can be used interchangeably. Examples include:

  • Cinnamomum verum J. PRESL -- Ceylon Cinnamon, Cinnamon
  • Cinnamomum aromaticum NEES -- Canela de la China (Sp.), Canelero chino (Sp.), Canelle de Cochinchine (Fr.), Cannelier Casse (Fr.), Cannelier de Chine (Fr.), Cassia, Cassia Bark, Cassia Lignea, China Junk Cassia, Chinazimt (Ger.), Chinese Cassia, Chinese Cinnamon, Chinesischer Zimtbaum (Ger.), Kashia-Keihi (Jap.), Saigon Cinnamon, Zimtcassie (Ger.)
  • Cinnamomum burmannii (NEES) BLUME -- Java Cinnamon, Padang Cassia
  • Cinnamomum sieboldii -- Japanese Cinnamon

It can be used in desserts, and curries as well as other savoury dishes where it adds a warm pleasant flavour to foods. It goes well with apple.

And at moderate doses it has healing properties particularly it seems for diabetes.

Background

Cinnamon consumed in its natural state has health benefits, but at overdose levels it is dangerous. The so called ‘health industry’ have started to produce cinnamon ‘supplements’ which are highly concentrated extracts of cinnamon that supposedly have health benefits. This is one area where the dangers lie.

According to Wikipedia “the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, states that 1 kg of (cassia) cinnamon powder contains approximately 2.1 to 4.4 g of coumarin. Powdered Cassia Cinnamon weighs 0.56 g/cc; therefore, 1 kg of Cassia Cinnamon powder is equal to 362.29 teaspoons. This means 1 teaspoon of cinnamon powder contains 5.8 to 12.1 mg of coumarin, which may be above the Tolerable Daily Intake for smaller individuals”.

More details can be found in the section Cinnamon supplements and smoking mixtures

Nutrients

The table below shows some of the mineral and vitamin content of cinnamon. 

Source: US National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference
Release 26   Software v.1.3.1 Nutrient values and weights are for edible portion

Nutrient

Unit


Value per 100 g

 

Proximates

Water

g

10.58

 

Energy

kcal

247

 

Protein

g

3.99

 

Total lipid (fat)

g

1.24

 

Carbohydrate, by difference

g

80.59

 

Fiber, total dietary

g

53.1

 

Sugars, total

g

2.17

 

Minerals

Calcium, Ca

mg

1002

 

Iron, Fe

mg

8.32

 

Magnesium, Mg

mg

60

 

Phosphorus, P

mg

64

 

Potassium, K

mg

431

 

Sodium, Na

mg

10

 

Zinc, Zn

mg

1.83

 

Vitamins

Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid

mg

3.8

 

Thiamin

mg

0.022

 

Riboflavin

mg

0.041

 

Niacin

mg

1.332

 

Vitamin B-6

mg

0.158

 

Folate, DFE

µg

6

 

Vitamin B-12

µg

0.00

 

Vitamin A, RAE

µg

15

 

Vitamin A, IU

IU

295

 

Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)

mg

2.32

 

Vitamin D (D2 + D3)

µg

0.0

 

Vitamin D

IU

0

 

Vitamin K (phylloquinone)

µg

31.2

 

Lipids

Fatty acids, total saturated

g

0.345

 

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated

g

0.246

 

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated

g

0.068

 

Fatty acids, total trans

g

0.000

 

Cholesterol

mg

0

 

Method

Cinnamon bark is widely used as a spice in both sweet and savoury dishes.

It is used in the preparation of some chocolate, especially in Mexico, which is the main importer of cinnamon. It is also used in many dessert recipes, such as apple pie, doughnuts, and cinnamon buns as well as spicy candies, coffee, tea, hot cocoa, and liqueurs.

In the Middle East, it is often used in savoury dishes of chicken and lamb. Cinnamon can also be used in pickling. Cinnamon has long been an important spice in Persian cuisine, used in a variety of thick soups, drinks, and meals. The cuisine of the northern part of India in Kashmir, for example, uses cinnamon and yogurt extensively in dishes which tend to be much milder with less use of chillis.

It is used in sambar powder or BisiBelebath powder in Karnataka, which gives it a rich aroma and unique taste. It is also used in Turkish cuisine for both sweet and savoury dishes.

How it works

see observations

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