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Dietary supplements

Category: Food

Type

Involuntary

Introduction and description

If we exclude vitamin supplements and mineral supplements both of which have entries on this site under the heading of food, what is left are dietary supplements.  What is a dietary supplement?  It has no true definition - something which can be eaten to supplement the diet is about as far as we can go.

There is something bizarre about the existence of dietary supplements. In countries where the availability of fresh food – vegetables, fish, meat, fruit, and other natural food stuffs has never been better, dietary supplements seem to be prevalent. You don't find dietary supplements in sub-sahara Africa.

So it is a money thing, the chance for companies to make money from the instilled fear in individuals that somehow they are not getting enough vitamins and minerals or whatever else they have been told they need, from what they eat, or that their illnesses are somehow diet related.

Their illness may be diet related, but the solution is of course to adjust the diet, not take supplements.

There are more than 50,000 dietary supplements available in the USA alone. More than half of the U.S. adult population (53% - 55%) consume dietary supplements of one sort or another. The supplements are not regulated and with the number available cannot be regulated. The government simply lacks the funds or clout needed to do so.  Even if it found a supplement to be dangerous, by the time the manufacturer had been taken through the courts they would have gone like the wind and opened up again with a new name and a new product.

In the USA again, the Dietary Supplement Health And Education Act of 1994 restricted the Food and Drug Administration from exerting authority over supplements, as long as manufacturers made no claims about preventing or treating disease. As a result, the FDA currently regulates dietary supplements as a category of food, and not pharmaceutical drugs.

In contrast with pharmaceutical manufacturers — who must go through a process of regulation before their product is released — supplement manufacturers do not have to do this.  In theory, supplement manufacturers must, however, indicate a product is safe prior to introduction. The product cannot be marketed for 75 days following filing of information about it with the FDA, in theory to enable the FDA to check its safety. In practice, however, the FDA has said it has lacked funds to determine whether a given supplement should be considered "hazardous".

According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health quite a number of these products are dangerous.  

There are literally thousands of studies on PubMed on the adverse effects of these products, but this website is about spiritual experiences, not the safety and efficacy of supplements, as such I have limited myself to a few of the many reports I found involving hallucinations and other 'interesting' experiences. Some of these were death experiences. Randomized clinical trials of certain supplements found 'increasing mortality rates'.

How it works

The one thing I cannot do is say how they work to give the experience, as generally speaking the true content of the supplements is unknown.

There are numerous instances where on testing supplements, it has been found that the stated foods in the packets have been supplemented with known drugs and pharmaceuticals, as such the cause of hallucinations could be anything. In the end, people are getting these experiences from poisoning.

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