Observations placeholder

Wilkins, Sir Hubert - October 28th 1937

Identifier

015830

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

A description of the experience

Thoughts through Space – Sir Hubert Wilkins and Harold M Sherman

AII arrangements were satisfactorily completed, and I flew back to Montreal late that afternoon. There I was busy all evening with Mr. R. 'W'.  Cook, the new radio man, and the officials of the Marconi Radio Company.

They told me that it would be at least a week before I could get the radio equipment. I discussed with them our proposed search for the lost Russians by moonlight, and the possible location of the lost men. I mentioned the experiment I was making with Sherman, and showed them some letters I had received, among them some of the letters I have quoted at the beginning of the first chapter.

Sherman that night received some extraordinary impressions. He recorded:

"You conferred in Ottawa with three important people. You may be delayed a week or more. Cheeseman is with you-carries a good luck charm. Skis about fitted.'

Sherman knew that I had gone to Ottawa but he would have no means of knowing that I would confer with three important people or that I would be delayed because of the radio for a week or more. It seems strange that he should have referred to Cheeseman who was not with me, but who had joined the others of the expedition at Winnipeg that day and here received a "good luck charm" in the form of a wooden penguin which I had carried from Mrs. Burt McConnell, and which Cheeseman was to receive upon his arrival at Winnipeg.

Sherman’s report for that night also includes reference to the Russian fliers.

Up to that time I had not received any evidence from Sherman as to his recordings, and was rather skeptical of his meeting with any measure of success in receiving impressions from thoughts expressed by me.

The following day, upon my return to New York, I received the first batch of Sherman’s records, but for some time I was too busy to look at them. Even when I had a chance to glance through them, it was not possible for me at once to make a close comparison of the recordings by Sherman with the records in my diary.

But it was obvious that, whatever might be taking place, Sherman was not getting a facsimile of my somewhat interrupted reviewings at the time set for our "appointments." He was, however, picking up impressions of practically all of my "strong" or emotional thoughts in relation to the expedition matters, which were expressed at various times of the day. This was of particular interest to me, since my own belief is that a thought strongly ejected will not fade with the first "spread." I believe that it will continue to revolve in our atmosphere or within such bounds that it may act as a stimulus to a responsive mind, and cause some reaction in the mind of another some hours, or even years after the thought has been emitted.

The source of the experience

Wilkins, Sir Hubert and Sherman, Harold

Concepts, symbols and science items

Concepts

Symbols

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Overloads

Extreme emotion

Commonsteps

References