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The uses of Kenyan aloes: an analysis of implications for names, distribution and conservation

Identifier

020982

Type of Spiritual Experience

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A description of the experience

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2015 Nov 25;11:82. doi: 10.1186/s13002-015-0060-0.

The uses of Kenyan aloes: an analysis of implications for names, distribution and conservation.

Bjorå CS1, Wabuyele E2,3, Grace OM4, Nordal I5, Newton LE6.

Author information

  • 1Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1172, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. charlotte.bjora@nhm.uio.no.
  • 2Department of Bioscience, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1066, Blindern, 0316, Oslo, Norway. ewabuyele@yahoo.com.
  • 3Department of Plant Sciences, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844, Nairobi, 00100, Kenya. ewabuyele@yahoo.com.
  • 4Comparative Plant & Fungal Biology, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Surrey, TW9 3AB, UK. o.grace@kew.org.
  • 5Department of Bioscience, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1066, Blindern, 0316, Oslo, Norway. inger.nordal@ibv.uio.no.
  • 6Department of Plant Sciences, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844, Nairobi, 00100, Kenya. ellyen@yahoo.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The genus Aloe is renowned for its medicinal and cosmetic properties and long history of use. Sixty-three Aloe species occur in Kenya, of which around 50 % are endemic. Several species of aloes are threatened with extinction and knowledge about their use is of major importance for sound conservation strategies. The main aims of this study were to assess the biocultural value of Aloe in Kenya by documenting local uses of aloes and evaluating how the vernacular names reflect the relative importance in different ethnic groups.

METHODS:

Ethnobotanical and ethnotaxonomical data were collected using field observations and semi-structured interviews. Information was collected by interviewing 63 respondents from nine different ethnic groups, representing different ages, gender and occupations. Statistical analyses were performed using R version 3.1.2.

RESULTS:

A total of 19 species of Aloe were found in the study area, of which 16 were used. On the generic level Aloe was easily distinguished. At species level, the local and scientific delimitation were almost identical for frequently used taxa. Aloe secundiflora, with 57 unique use records was the most important species. The two most frequently mentioned Aloe treatments, were malaria and poultry diseases. In our study area neither age nor gender had a significant influence on the level of knowledge of Aloe use. Finally, no correlation was found between extent of use and people's perception of decrease in local aloe populations. The aloes are highly appreciated and are therefore propagated and transported over large areas when people relocate.

CONCLUSION:

Biocultural value is reflected in the ethnotaxonomy of Aloe in Kenya. Different ethnic groups recognise their most-valued Aloe at the genus level as "the aloe" and add explanatory names for the other species, such as the "spotted aloe" and the "one-legged aloe". Widespread species of Aloe have the highest number of uses. There is no obvious correlation with high use and decrease in abundance of aloes locally, and we found no compelling evidence for local uses causing devastating damage to populations of the 19 species in use, whereas habitat loss and commercial harvesting appear to be of urgent concern for these important plants.

PMID:

26607663

The source of the experience

PubMed

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