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Incidents in My Life - D D Home - Séance witnessed by Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Hall, Lady Dunsany, and Mrs. Adelaide Senior on Easter Eve, 1866.

Identifier

024670

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

Madam Home - D D Home his life his mission

[These] manifestations were witnessed at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Hall on Easter Eve, 1866. Five persons composed the circle, the host and hostess, Lady Dunsany, Mrs. Adelaide Senior, and Mr. Home. A narrative of the occurrence was drawn up a few days later by Mrs. Senior, was submitted in turn to Mr. and Mrs. Hall and Lady Dunsany for their endorsement, and subsequently, with the consent of all four witnesses, was published by Mr. Home in his second volume of Incidents.

The first manifestations, including the wonderful music played by no earthly hands, had taken place in a brilliantly lit room.

A description of the experience

Incidents in My Life – D D Home

When Mr. Home arrived he was pale and worn, and we feared that we should have few manifestations. He sat down to the piano, and played and sang for some time; and on his beginning a little Russian air, a favourite of his late wife's, a chair which was at some distance from the piano slid up and placed itself beside him. I was sitting close to the piano on the other side, and I first saw the chair move.

We sat down at the table, which at once began to vibrate and tremble, and was raised off the floor to a considerable height.

Very loud and heavy knocks were heard on the table, the floor, and the furniture round the room; presently the accordion was touched, the alphabet was asked for, and it was spelt out 'We will play the earth-life of One Who was not of earth.'

First we had simple, sweet, soft music for some minutes; then it became intensely sad; then the tramp, tramp, as of a body of men marching mingled with the music, and I exclaimed, 'The march to Calvary!' Then three times the tap-tapping sound of a hammer on a nail (like two metals meeting). A crash, and a burst of wailing which seemed to fill the room, followed; then there came a burst of glorious triumphal music, more grand than any of us had ever listened to, and we exclaimed, 'The Resurrection!'

It thrilled to all our hearts.

Nothing more was done for some time, and we decided upon putting out the lights in the rooms, so as only to have that from the outside which came through the conservatory  (from a hanging lamp there, explains Mr. Hall). ...

Soon after this, we observed the face of Mr. S. C. Hall shining as if covered with silver light; we all remarked it and commented upon it. The accordion was carried round the circle, playing beautifully; it rested on the head of our host, then on my shoulder, and then went on to Mrs. Hall, who was next to me. ("Mr. Home's hand never being near the instrument," adds Mrs. Senior in a subsequent letter.)

Mr. Home was then raised up to the ceiling, which he touched, and regretted not having a pencil to make a mark there. When he came down, Mr. Hall gave him one, hoping that he might be again raised; and in five minutes after he was so, and left a cross on the ceiling. Just before this took place we saw his whole face and chest covered with the same silvery light which we had observed on our host's face. We had been sitting all this time at the table; and soon after our hands were touched and patted by other hands, and our brows touched by loved hands whose touch we knew. Shortly afterwards we heard the knocks and sounds die away in the distance out of doors, and we felt that it was all over.

That burst of music was still thrilling on our hearts. Nothing of mortal composition could equal it, and its sound was that of a fine organ. We greatly regretted that no one in the room could take down the notes. The wondrous effect of the sound of feet, and the sound of the hammer and nails running like a thread through the music, it is impossible that those who have not listened to it could understand; in the music itself also there was a mixture of tones out of my power to describe.

The source of the experience

Home, D. D.

Concepts, symbols and science items

Symbols

Science Items

Levitation

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Suppressions

Being left handed
Inherited genes

Commonsteps

References