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Croiset, Gerard - The telepathic experience of Mr. van Busschbach, the state inspector of elementary schools in Amsterdam

Identifier

022923

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

A description of the experience

Croiset the Clairvoyant - Jack Harrison Pollack

An Educator’s Dilemma

Mr. I. G. van Busschbach is a state inspector of elementary schools in Amsterdam, the capital of the Netherlands.

With Professor Tenhaeff’s cooperation, this important school administrator in 1951 studied the telepathic abilities of elementary school children in Amsterdam and Utrecht. His illuminating experiments, which were carried a giant step further several years later by Miss Nicky Louwerens at the Parapsychology Institute in her epic study of 1188 Utrecht school children, demonstrated the clear-cut telepathic relation between many pupils and their teachers.

For example, during a geography lesson in a Dutch elementary school, a teacher pointed his stick at towns on a blank map of Spain and Portugal. "At a certain-moment I wanted to touch Oporto, Portugal, which I was thinking about," recalls the teacher, “but my stick accidentally went to Barcelona, Spain. I was astounded when many pupils wrote down Oporto."

In 1958, at the request of Dr. J. B. Rhine of Duke University, Mr. van Busschbach repeated these pupil-teacher experiments with elementary and junior high school children and their teachers in Durham and Burlington, North Carolina, with similar results.

Mr. van Busschbach had a telepathic experience himself with Gerard Croiset in the Netherlands in April 1955. The Amsterdam educator was disturbed because a set of 600 of his valuable school research papers was missing. They had been sent to an institute of applied scientific research in The Hague for mathematical analysis. Mr. van Busschbach had written many letters requesting that they be returned, but one of the top officials, Mr. M., kept insisting that they had already been sent back; that a thorough search had been made at the institute, and it was utterly impossible that these missing papers were still there. Somewhat annoyed, Mr. M said he distinctly "remembered" that the school papers which Mr. van Busschbach had "lost" had been forwarded to him some months earlier.

Desperately needing these forms, but getting nowhere with Mr. M. for nearly six months, on October 13th, Mr. van Busschbach telephoned Gerard Croiset, with whom he was acquainted. In this private call from his home in Haarlem, the troubled educator told the paragnost that he had mailed the forms to The Hague institute, but that they had mysteriously disappeared.

Without hesitation, Croiset replied that the papers were in a room with two high cupboards.

“The missing papers are in one of them, on the right," the sensitive emphasized. "I see an office chair, a revolving chair with three legs, and a writing desk with a green top."

The following day Van Busschbach went to The Hague institute with this information. When he entered Mr. M.'s office which he had never visited before, it immediately struck him as bearing a strong resemblance to the room that Croiset had described to him the day before. He quickly noticed the three-legged chair and the green-topped desk. Mr. van Busschbach told Mr. M. what Croiset had said, and requested that the cupboard on the right be opened.

At first, Mr. M. protested that it was absurd to think that the missing forms were in his cupboard. Nevertheless, he agreed to look, though still doubting Croiset's images.

To his tremendous astonishment, the missing forms were there, improperly filed, on the top shelf of the cupboard on the right, exactly as Croiset had predicted.

In explaining this type of telepathy, parapsychologist Tenhaeff says, "In most of these cases, the 'losers' had placed the objects themselves in such places, but were thinking of other things when they did so. They had forgotten about their actions. Parapsychological research shows that this latent knowledge under certain conditions can be conveyed telepathically to a paragnost”.___

The source of the experience

Croiset, Gerard

Concepts, symbols and science items

Symbols

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Commonsteps

References