Observations placeholder

Conductive education for children with cerebral palsy: effects on hand motor functions relevant to activities of daily living

Identifier

023240

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

A description of the experience

Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2008 Feb;89(2):251-9. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2007.08.138.

Conductive education for children with cerebral palsy: effects on hand motor functions relevant to activities of daily living.

Blank R1, von Kries R, Hesse S, von Voss H.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Social Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Child Center Munich, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Germany. rjblank@gmx.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the effects of conductive education, a combined educational and therapeutic task-oriented approach for children with cerebral palsy (CP), on their hand motor functions and activities of daily living (ADLs).

DESIGN:

Individual cohort study (B-A-B design).

SETTING:

Ambulatory, referral center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Sixty-four children with CP, severity Gross Motor Function Classification System levels II through IV, ages 3 to 6 years.

INTERVENTIONS:

Phases B: a 4.5-month period of special education, including 2 hours of individual physiotherapy or occupational therapy per week (special education). Phase A: during a 9-month period, conductive education was administered in 3 blocks of 4 weeks (7 hours daily from Monday through Friday); between the blocks, special education was applied as in the B phases.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Transformed sum scores (0.00-1.00) for coordinative (eg, force-movement synergy during object manipulation, aiming) and for elementary hand functions (eg, maximum grip force, tapping), based on kinetic and kinematic measures; standardized parent questionnaire to measure ADL competence scores from 0.00 (dependence) to 1.00 (independence). Outcome parameters were changes in these parameters during phase A (intervention) compared with average changes during the B phases (pre- and postintervention). Student t tests were used for dependent samples.

RESULTS:

Conductive education improved coordinative hand functions by 20% to 25% from baseline, compared with no improvement during special education; the preferred hand improved from .38 to .48 (mean, .10; 95% confidence interval [CI], .086-.114) and the nonpreferred hand improved from .39 to .47 (mean, .08; 95% CI, .034-.116). There were no changes in elementary hand motor functions. ADL competence improved by .11 (95% CI, .070-.149), from .50 to .61 ( approximately 20%), compared with no significant improvement under special education.

CONCLUSIONS:

Conductive education improved coordinative hand functions and ADLs in children with CP. There was no effect on elementary hand functions.

PMID:  18226648

The source of the experience

PubMed

Concepts, symbols and science items

Concepts

Symbols

Science Items

Activities and commonsteps

Activities

Overloads

Cerebral palsy
Muscle diseases

Commonsteps

Conductive Education

References