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Art Tatum - Humoresque, Elegy and Chopin

Identifier

025557

Type of Spiritual Experience

Background

A description of the experience

ART TATUM - SOLO PIANO

Antonín Dvořák - Humoresque
Jules Massenet - Elegy
Pianoforte : ART TATUM
recorder December 28 - 1953 Los Angeles


Fryderyk Chopin - Valse in C sharp minor Op.64 No.2
Pianoforte : ART TATUM
Recorded : ??

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Wikipedia

Tatum built upon stride and classical piano influences to develop a novel and unique piano style. He introduced a strong, swinging pulse to jazz piano, highlighted with cadenzas that swept across the entire keyboard. His interpretations of popular songs were exuberant, sophisticated and intricate.

Jazz soloing in the 1930s had not yet evolved into the free-ranging extended improvisations that flowered in the bebop era of the 1940s, 1950s and beyond. But jazz musicians were beginning to incorporate improvisation while playing over the chord changes of tunes, and Tatum was a leader in that movement. He sometimes improvised lines that presaged bebop and later jazz genres, although generally not venturing far from the original melodic line.

Tatum embellished melodic lines, however, with an array of signature devices and runs that appeared throughout his repertoire. As he matured, Tatum became more adventurous in abandoning the written melody and expanding his improvisations.

Tatum's sound was attributable to both his harmonic inventiveness and technical prowess.

Many of his harmonic concepts and larger chord voicings (e.g., 13th chords with various flat or sharp intervals) were well ahead of their time in the 1930s (except for their partial emergence in popular songs of the Jazz Age) and they would be explored by bebop-era musicians a decade later.

He worked some of the upper extensions of chords into his lines, a practice which was further developed by Bud Powell and Charlie Parker, which in turn was an influence on the development of 'modern jazz'. Tatum also pioneered the use of dissonance in jazz piano, as can be heard, for example, on his recording of "Aunt Hagar's Blues", which uses extensive dissonance to achieve a bluesy effect. In addition to using major and minor seconds, dissonance was inherent in the complex chords that Tatum frequently used.

His protean style was elaborate, pyrotechnic, dramatic and joyous, combining stride, jazz, swing, boogie-woogie and classical elements, while the musical ideas flowed in rapid-fire fashion. Benny Green wrote in his collected work of essays, The Reluctant Art, that "Tatum has been the only jazz musician to date who has made an attempt to conceive a style based upon all styles, to master the mannerisms of all schools and then synthesize those into something personal." He was playful, spontaneous and often inserted quotes from other songs into his improvisations.

 

The source of the experience

Tatum, Art

Concepts, symbols and science items

Concepts

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Mnemonist

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