Print this page

Overload

Extreme unhappiness

Category: Events

Type

Involuntary

Introduction and description

Technically speaking a doctor might classify extreme unhappiness as depression and term it an illness, but I do not want this section to be a technical diatribe on depression with papers on the amygdala, the neurotransmitters involved and the other physical symptoms, because the cause of spiritual experiences are functional and in this case caused by ‘emotional overload’.  So functionally, depression can run the full gamut of extreme unhappiness, sadness and overwhelming melancholy.

Background

 

I have made the distinction between grief and extreme unhappiness because grief is a response to loss, particularly to the loss of someone or something to which a bond was formed, whereas extreme unhappiness may not be caused by loss, but simply some other circumstance – a very unhappy marriage, a job that you don’t like or cannot do, a boss that does nothing but criticise, children who cause you pain by their actions, or simply a deep seated feeling that nothing is right – your life is not going in the direction you want it to.

How it works

Very often unhappiness is caused by feeling trapped within an environment which causes pain, but appears to offer no hope of escape.  You cannot rid yourself of an abusive partner for example, if you are a nervous fearful soul the thought of leaving an unhappy marriage can send tremors of fear coursing up your spine.  ‘Better the devil you know’ you say, but of course no, not better the devil you know.

Within you the unconscious cries out for change.  What it responds to is pleasure and pain not some abstruse logical argument.  And all it knows every day is the remorseless tirade of pain.  What it has lost is happiness and pleasure and joy – so it cries out.  The child in us cries – the subconscious child.  And the intensity of emotion blots everything else out – absolutely everything – reason, logic, desires and objectives, obligations and opportunities.   Nothing is left except the vast sea of emotional PAIN so hard you think it will kill you.

And the Will is overwhelmed.  It can do nothing against such an onslaught, it has nothing in its armoury to help – no learnt function can match this barrage of anguish.

So it gives in and the Composer takes over. 

Occasionally the Composer will provide a sense of inexplicable peace amid the feelings of pain. But where you could do something about the pain it will give you lessons, lesson after lesson after lesson.  Sometimes a stick, sometimes a carrot.  

‘You can do something’, it is telling you, ‘if you find courage you can change I am here with you, your Higher spirit.  Change’.

References and further reading

Paintings by Leon Spilliaert

Related observations