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Agent Orange poisoning

Identifier

006266

Type of spiritual experience

Hallucination

Background

Agent Orange is the combination of the code names for Herbicide Orange (HO) and Agent LNX, one of the herbicides and defoliants used by the U.S. military as part of its chemical warfare program, Operation Ranch Hand, during the Vietnam War from 1961 to 1971. Vietnam estimates 400,000 people were killed or maimed, and 500,000 children born with birth defects as a result of its use. The Red Cross of Vietnam estimates that up to 1 million people are disabled or have health problems due to Agent Orange.

A 50:50 mixture of 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D, it was manufactured for the U.S. Department of Defense primarily by Monsanto Corporation and Dow Chemical. The 2,4,5-T used to produce Agent Orange was later discovered to be contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD), an extremely toxic dioxin compound. It was given its name from the color of the orange-striped 55 US gallon (208 l) barrels in which it was shipped

During the Vietnam War, between 1962 and 1971, the United States military sprayed nearly 20,000,000 US gallons (76,000,000 l) of material containing chemical herbicides and defoliants mixed with jet fuel in Vietnam, eastern Laos and parts of Cambodia, as part of Operation Ranch Hand The program's goal was to defoliate forested and rural land, depriving guerrillas of cover; another goal was to induce forced draft urbanization, destroying the ability of peasants to support themselves in the countryside, and forcing them to flee to the U.S. dominated cities, thus depriving the guerrillas of their rural support and food supply.

The US began to target food crops in October 1962, primarily using Agent Blue. In 1965, 42 percent of all herbicide spraying was dedicated to food crops. Rural-to-urban migration rates dramatically increased in South Vietnam, as peasants escaped the war and famine in the countryside by fleeing to the U.S.-dominated cities. The urban population in South Vietnam nearly tripled: from 2.8 million people in 1958, to 8 million by 1971. The rapid flow of people led to a fast-paced and uncontrolled urbanization; an estimated 1.5 million people were living in Saigon slums

United States Air Force records show that at least 6,542 spraying missions took place over the course of Operation Ranch Hand. By 1971, 12 percent of the total area of South Vietnam had been sprayed with defoliating chemicals, at an average concentration of 13 times the recommended USDA application rate for domestic use. In South Vietnam alone, an estimated 10 million hectares (25 million acres, 39,000 square miles) of agricultural land was ultimately destroyed. In some areas TCDD concentrations in soil and water were hundreds of times greater than the levels considered "safe" by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Overall, more than 20% of South Vietnam's forests were sprayed at least once over a nine-year period.

No one appears to have bothered to collect data for the millions of people in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos affected by this, but it does appear that – irony of ironies – there were a large number of Americans affected and they have been fighting like things possessed for several years to get compensation,………..  to no avail of course because they are up against the US  government.

A description of the experience

Citation NR: 9609500    

Decision Date: 04/05/96             Archive Date: 04/16/96

DOCKET NO.  89--14 350           )           DATE

            )

            )

On appeal from the

Department of Veterans Affairs Regional Office in St.

Petersburg, Florida

THE ISSUES

 1.  Entitlement to service connection for a heart condition.

2.  Entitlement to service connection for residuals of Agent

Orange exposure to include boils, rashes, prostate problems,

nightmares, sweats, hallucinations, bad temper, disciplinary

problems, loss of teeth, bone deterioration and heart

disease.

 REPRESENTATION

Appellant represented by:           Disabled American Veterans

 ATTORNEY FOR THE BOARD

 C.A. Skow, Associate Counsel

The source of the experience

Ordinary person

Concepts and Symbols used in the text or image

Activities