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Lorazepam, Ativan and Temesta

Identifier

002202

Type of spiritual experience

Hallucination (2836)

A description of the experience

Lorazepam    - introduced in 1977 is marketed under the brand names Ativan  and Temesta.  It is a “high-potency short-to-intermediate-acting 3-hydroxy benzodiazepine” drug that has all five intrinsic benzodiazepine effects: anxiolytic, amnesic, sedative/hypnotic, anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant.  As a measure of its ongoing success, it has been marketed under more than seventy brand names:

Almazine, Alzapam, Anxiedin, Anxira, Anzepam, Aplacasse, Aplacassee, Apo-Lorazepam, Aripax, Azurogen, Bonatranquan, Bonton, Control, Donix, Duralozam, Efasedan, Emotion, Emotival, Idalprem, Kalmalin, Larpose, Laubeel, Lopam, Lorabenz, Loram, Lorans, Lorapam, Lorat, Lorax, Lorazene, Lorazep, Lorazepam, Lorazin, Lorafen (PL), Lorazon, Lorenin, Loridem, Lorivan, Lorsedal, Lorzem, Lozepam, Merlit, Nervistop L, Nervistopl, NIC, Novhepar, Novolorazem, Orfidal, Piralone, Placidia, Placinoral, Punktyl, Quait, Renaquil, Rocosgen, Securit, Sedarkey, Sedatival, Sedizepan, Sidenar, Silence, Sinestron, Somnium, Stapam, Tavor, Titus, Tolid, Tranqil, Tranqipam, Trapax, Trapaxm, Trapex, Upan, Wintin, and Wypax.

Uses - It is used for the  treatment of anxiety, insomnia, acute seizures including status epilepticus and sedation of hospitalised patients, as well as sedation of aggressive patients. It is used in premedication because of its relatively potent amnesic, anxiolytic and sedative effects. It is given before a general anaesthetic to reduce the amount of anaesthetic agent required, or before unpleasant awake procedures, such as in dentistry or endoscopies, to “reduce anxiety, to increase compliance, and to induce amnesia for the procedure”.  

Addiction, tolerance and dependence - It is supposed to be used medically for the short-term  - 2 to 4 weeks maximum.  However, it has very high addictive potential and is often continuously used way beyond its medically advised period of treatment.  It has  – as you can see – a very impressive record of producing unwanted hallucinations and other spiritual experiences.   It is also used ‘recreationally’.  Its popularity in the recreational community may have something to do with its relatively quick action.  Peak effects roughly coincide with peak serum levels, which occur 10 minutes after intravenous injection, up to 60 minutes after intramuscular injection, and 90 to 120 minutes after oral administration, but initial effects will be noted before this. A clinically relevant lorazepam dose will normally be effective for 6 to 12 hours. 

Lorazepam is highly protein bound and is extensively metabolised into pharmacologically inactive metabolites. Due to its poor lipid solubility lorazepam is absorbed relatively slowly. But its poor lipid solubility and high degree of protein binding (85-90%) mean that lorazepam's volume of distribution is mainly the vascular compartment, causing relatively prolonged peak effects. This contrasts with the highly lipid-soluble diazepam, which, although rapidly absorbed orally or rectally, soon redistributes from the serum to other parts of the body, in particular body fat. This explains why one lorazepam dose, despite lorazepam's shorter serum half-life, has more prolonged peak effects than an equivalent diazepam dose.

 Lorazepam is a Schedule IV drug under the United Nations Convention on Psychotropic Substances. 

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Withdrawal -  Lorazepam appears to have more profound adverse effects on memory than other benzodiazepines.

Side effects are the same as with all benzodiapezines.  Lorazepam is not usually fatal in overdose, but may cause fatal respiratory depression if taken in overdose with alcohol. The combination also causes synergistic enhancement of the disinhibitory and amnesic effects of both drugs, with “potentially embarrassing or criminal consequences”.

 On Jan, 24, 2017  66,821 people reported to have side effects when taking Lorazepam.
Among them, 616 people (0.92%) have Hallucination

On Jan, 29, 2017 66,821 people reported to have side effects when taking Lorazepam.
Among them, 316 people (0.47%) have Hallucination, Auditory

On Jan, 29, 2017 66,821 people reported to have side effects when taking Lorazepam.
Among them, 8 people (0.01%) have Hallucination, Olfactory

On Jan, 29, 2017  66,821 people reported to have side effects when taking Lorazepam.
Among them, 12 people (0.02%) have Hallucination, Tactile

On Jan, 27, 2017  66,821 people reported to have side effects when taking Lorazepam.
Among them, 863 people (1.29%) have Hallucinogen Abuse

On Jan, 19, 2017 43,709 people reported to have side effects when taking Ativan.
Among them, 588 people (1.35%) have Hallucination

On Jan, 28, 2017 43,709 people reported to have side effects when taking Ativan.
Among them, 235 people (0.54%) have Hallucination, Auditory

On Jan, 27, 2017 43,709 people reported to have side effects when taking Ativan.
Among them, 7 people (0.02%) have Hallucination, Olfactory

On Jan, 22, 2017 43,709 people reported to have side effects when taking Ativan.
Among them, 4 people (0.01%) have Hallucination, Tactile

On Jan, 26, 2017 43,709 people reported to have side effects when taking Ativan.
Among them, 187 people (0.43%) have Hallucinogen Abuse

 

The source of the experience

eHealthme

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