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Hack Tuke, Daniel – Healing - -Background approach to healing summary

Identifier

026070

Type of spiritual experience

A description of the experience

As described in Illustrations Of The Influence Of The Mind Upon The Body In Health And Disease, Designed To Elucidate The Action Of The Imagination - Daniel Hack Tuke, M.D., M.R.C.P.,

PART II. THE EMOTIONS.
CHAPTER VII. INFLUENCE OF THE EMOTIONS UPON SENSATION.

1. STEER ALL POSITIVE THOUGHT TO THE PART TO BE HEALED - Thought strongly directed to any part tends to increase its vascularity, and consequently its sensibility. Associated with a powerful emotion, these effects are more strikingly shown. And, when not directed to any special part, an excited emotional condition induces a general sensitiveness to impressions .

2. TO RELIEVE PAIN AND DISCOMFORT DO NOT THINK OF THE AFFECTED ORGAN, DIRECT POSITIVE EMOTION TO OTHER ACTIVITIES-  Thought strongly directed away from any part, especially when this is occasioned by Emotion, lessens its sensibility. As the activity of the cerebral functions during deep intellectual operations excludes consciousness of the impressions made upon the sensory nerves generally, so an absorbing emotion effectually produces the same result.

3. POSITIVE THOUGHTS PROMOTE POSITIVE BODILY CHANGES - The emotions may cause sensations, either by directly exciting the sensory ganglia and the central extremities of the nerves of sensation, or by inducing vascular changes in a certain part of the body, which excite the sensitive nerves at their peripheral terminations.

4. MIND CAN CONTROL MATTER - There is no sensation, whether general or special, excited by agents acting upon the body from without, which cannot be excited also from within by emotional states affecting the sensory ganglia ; such sensation being referred by the mind to the point at which the nerve terminates in the body.

The source of the experience

Hack Tuke, Daniel

Concepts and Symbols used in the text or image

Activities

Observation contributed by: Henry Ibberson