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Nizami – Makhzanol Asrar (The Treasury of Mysteries) – from The First Discourse 02

Identifier

025982

Type of spiritual experience

A description of the experience

THE FIRST DISCOURSE

The story of the king who despaired, and of how he was forgiven

896. A just ruler saw a tyrant in a dream.

897. He said to him: "How did God treat thee, the tyrant, on the night of thy death on account of thy tyranny? "

898. He answered: "When my life ended, I looked upon all creation

899. "To see from whom I could expect guidance, or upon whom God had looked with favour.

900. "No man had any care for me in his heart; none had any thought of helping me.

(76) 901. "I trembled like the willow; my face was covered with shame, and my heart was filled with despair.

902. "I gave up all my hopes and relied upon the forgiveness of God,

903. "Saying: 'O Thou, before whom I am humbled and ashamed, forgive the wretched and pass on.

904. "Although, I have disobeyed Thy command, do not reject me, since I am rejected by all men.

905. "'Either punish me by fire, or do the contrary to what all others do."

906. "When the Friend saw me shamed before Him, the friend of the friendless aided me.

907. "My words moved the grace of His generosity; He cast off my burden and raised me up."

998. Every remorseful breath drawn is a safeguard against the tumult of the day of resurrection.

909. Oh thou who weighest the wind, all thy words are but a measure of loss and scales for toil.

910. Suppose that thou hadst had this measure of loss for years and for months, and that thou hadst lived through these months and these years,

911. Thy scales are without weights and pearls; thy measure is empty, and thy span of life is full.

912. Do not make the weight of the earth the stone in thy scales; do not make an amulet of the bead of clay.

913. That to which thou art alive, is but a silver coin; that by which thou art alive, is but a breath.

914. Give back that which thou takest from behind this veil; do not take it thyself, give what thou canst,

915. Until that day when it will be well for thee to have thy neck free and thy mouth empty.

916. The debts of orphans will not weigh thee down, and the burden of widows will not be on thy shoulder.

917. Leave this old worn-out carpet; cast away this stained garment.

The source of the experience

Nizami

Concepts and Symbols used in the text or image

Activities

Observation contributed by: Francis Keeble