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Medical nutrition therapy as a potential complementary treatment for psoriasis--five case reports

Identifier

017212

Type of spiritual experience

A description of the experience

Altern Med Rev. 2004 Sep;9(3):297-307.

Medical nutrition therapy as a potential complementary treatment for psoriasis--five case reports.

Brown AC1, Hairfield M, Richards DG, McMillin DL, Mein EA, Nelson CD.

This research evaluated five case studies of patients with psoriasis following a dietary regimen.

There is no cure for psoriasis and the multiple treatments currently available only attempt to reduce the severity of symptoms. Treatments range from topical applications, systemic therapies, and phototherapy; while some are effective, many are associated with significant adverse effects.

There is a need for effective, affordable therapies with fewer side effects that address the causes of the disorder.

Evaluation consisted of a study group of five patients diagnosed with chronic plaque psoriasis (two men and three women, average age 52 years; range 40-68 years) attending a 10-day, live-in program during which a physician assessed psoriasis symptoms and bowel permeability. Subjects were then instructed on continuing the therapy protocol at home for six months.

The dietary protocol, based on Edgar Cayce readings, included a diet of fresh fruits and vegetables, small amounts of protein from fish and fowl, fiber supplements, olive oil, and avoidance of red meat, processed foods, and refined carbohydrates.

Saffron tea and slippery elm bark water were consumed daily.

The five psoriasis cases, ranging from mild to severe at the study onset, improved on all measured outcomes over a six-month period when measured by the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) (average pre- and post-test scores were 18.2 and 8.7, respectively), the Psoriasis Severity Scale (PSS) (average pre- and post-test scores were 14.6 and 5.4, respectively), and the lactulose/mannitol test of intestinal permeability (average pre- and post-test scores were 0.066 to 0.026, respectively). These results suggest a dietary regimen based on Edgar Cayce's readings may be an effective medical nutrition therapy for the complementary treatment of psoriasis; however, further research is warranted to confirm these results.

PMID:  15387720

The source of the experience

PubMed

Activities

Observation contributed by: John Bryant