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Samuel Rogers - Man's going home

Identifier

015559

Type of spiritual experience

Hallucination

Background

Samuel Rogers (30 July 1763 – 18 December 1855) was an English poet, during his lifetime one of the most celebrated, although his fame has long since been eclipsed by his Romantic colleagues and friends Wordsworth, Coleridge and Byron.

In 1850, on Wordsworth's death, Rogers was asked to succeed him as poet laureate, but declined the honour on account of his age. For the last five years of his life he was confined to his chair in consequence of a fall in the street. He died in London at 92, a remarkable age for the time

A description of the experience

Samuel Rogers – from Man's going Home

But there are moments which he calls his own
Then, never less alone than when alone
Those that he loved so long and sees no more,
Loved and still loves – not dead – but gone before
He gathers round him; and revives at will
Scenes in his life – that breathe enchantment still -
That come not now at dreary intervals -
But where a light as from the Blessed falls,
A light such guests bring ever – pure and holy -
Lapping the soul in sweetest melancholy
- Ah then less willing (nor the choice condemn)
To live with others than to think on them.

…....

They who watch by him, see not; but he sees,
Sees and exults – were ever dreams like these?
They, who watch by him, hear not; but he hears,
And Earth recedes, and Heaven itself appears 

The source of the experience

Poet other

Concepts and Symbols used in the text or image

Activities

Observation contributed by: John Bryant