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Turn off the TV and dance!

Identifier

013370

Type of spiritual experience

A description of the experience

Ethn Dis. 2013 Autumn;23(4):452-61.

Turn off the TV and dance! Participation in culturally tailored health interventions: implications for obesity prevention among Mexican American girls.

Azevedo KJ1, Mendoza S2, Fernández M2, Haydel KF2, Fujimoto M2, Tirumalai EC2, Robinson TN2.

  • 1Solutions Science Lab, Division of General Pediatrics & Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Medical School Office Building, 1265 Welch Road, X129, Stanford, CA 94305-5415, USA. Dr.KathrynAzevedo@gmail.com
  • 2Solutions Science Lab, Division of General Pediatrics & Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Medical School Office Building, 1265 Welch Road, X129, Stanford, CA 94305-5415, USA.

Abstract

Our evaluation study identifies facilitators and barriers to participation among families participating in the treatment arm of Stanford ECHALE. This culturally tailored obesity prevention trial consisted of a combined intervention with two main treatment components:

1) a folkloric dance program; and

2) a screen time reduction curriculum

designed for 7-11 year old Latinas and their families. We conducted 83 interviews (40 parents and 43 girls) in participant homes after 6 months of enrollment in the ECHALE trial. The Spradley ethnographic method and NVivo 8.0 were used to code and analyze narrative data. Three domains emerged for understanding participation:

1) family cohesiveness;

2) perceived gains; and

3) culturally relevant program structure.

Two domains emerged for non-participation: program requirements and perceived discomforts. Non-parametric, Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the relationships with participant attendance data. Sustained participation was most strongly influenced by the domain perceived gains when parents reported better self-esteem, confidence, improved attitude, improved grades, etc. (Spearman r = .45, P = .003).

Alternatively, under the domain, perceived discomforts, with subthemes such as child bullying, participation in the combined intervention was inversely associated with attendance (Spearman r = -.38, P = .02).

Family-centered, school-based, community obesity prevention programs that focus on tangible short-term gains for girls may generate greater participation rates, enhance social capital, and promote community empowerment. These factors can be emphasized in future obesity prevention program design and implementation.

PMID:  24392608

The source of the experience

PubMed

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