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Anna L Barbauld - From Tomorrow

Identifier

012545

Type of spiritual experience

Background

Anna Laetitia Barbauld ( 20 June 1743 – 9 March 1825) was a prominent English poet, essayist, literary critic, editor, and children's author.

A "woman of letters" who published in multiple genres, Barbauld had a successful writing career at a time when female professional writers were rare. She was a noted teacher at the Palgrave Academy and an innovative children's writer; her primers provided a model for more than a century. Her essays demonstrated that it was possible for a woman to be publicly engaged in politics, and other women authors such as Elizabeth Benger emulated her. Barbauld's literary career spanned numerous periods in British literary history: her work promoted the values of both the Enlightenment and Sensibility, and her poetry was foundational to the development of British Romanticism. Barbauld was also a literary critic, and her anthology of 18th-century British novels helped establish the canon as known today.

Barbauld's career as a poet ended abruptly in 1812 with the publication of Eighteen Hundred and Eleven, which criticised Britain's participation in the Napoleonic Wars. Vicious reviews shocked Barbauld, and she published nothing else during her lifetime.

A description of the experience

From Tomorrow – A L Barbaud

Life.  I know not what thou art,
But know that thou and I must part;
And when, or how, or where we met
I own to me's a secret yet
Life; we've been long together
Through pleasant and through cloudy weather;
'Tis hard to part when friends are dear
Perhaps 'twill cost a sigh, a tear;
Then steal away, give little warning,
Choose thine own time;
Say not Good Night – but in some brighter clime
Bid me Good Morning

The source of the experience

Poet other

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